Gephardt Seeks a Higher Office, but He Doesn't Know Which One: Options Include President and Speaker of the House

By Akers, Mary Ann | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 5, 1998 | Go to article overview

Gephardt Seeks a Higher Office, but He Doesn't Know Which One: Options Include President and Speaker of the House


Akers, Mary Ann, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


ST. LOUIS - Rep. Richard A. Gephardt must make a serious decision in the next seven weeks: Run for president, or hedge his bets on becoming House speaker in two years?

Mr. Gephardt awoke in his district here yesterday morning after a few hours of sleep, happy and amazed at the real choice confronting him. He'd believed Republicans were going to trounce Democrats in Tuesday's congressional elections.

"I was despondent in the last two weeks," Mr. Gephardt said in an interview. "I thought we were just going to get killed."

Instead, Democrats picked up five House seats, creating the narrowest margin between the two parties in that chamber since the 1930s and putting Democrats in position to take back the House.

That means Mr. Gephardt, the House Democratic leader, stands his best chance ever of becoming speaker.

Before it was known just how close Democrats had come to wiping out the Republicans' 11-seat majority, Mr. Gephardt said Tuesday evening that he would make a decision by the end of the year on whether to run for president in 2000. But yesterday, after the results sunk in, he seemed more ambivalent.

"I haven't thought about this and I haven't thought it through in any way. I've got to look at all this and talk to my colleagues and figure this out," he said, looking down in his coffee.

He then looked up and said, "One thing I do know is we are poised to win the House back."

That is precisely why some people close to Mr. Gephardt believe he will not run for president, but will focus his attention full time on his party controlling the House. That goal is more important for Mr. Gephardt than risking another losing presidential bid, they say, especially when it isn't clear that Democrats can hold the White House in 2000.

"When you look at how important the decision of 2000 is for the future of the party, you have to concede that getting the House back is going to be the most important thing," said one Democratic House member.

And when there is "a real possibility of not getting the White House," the member said, "it would be horrific not to get the House back. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Gephardt Seeks a Higher Office, but He Doesn't Know Which One: Options Include President and Speaker of the House
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.