Let Uncle Sam's Web Sites Help You Find a Federal Job

By Burn, Timothy | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 2, 1998 | Go to article overview

Let Uncle Sam's Web Sites Help You Find a Federal Job


Burn, Timothy, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


The image of the federal government as an employer has taken a beating in recent years as tales of waste, cronyism and inefficiency have continued to spill out of Washington, D.C.

The old adage that "It is not what you know but who you know" gained new credibility this year from the "Monica-Lewinsky-goes-to-Washington" saga.

No doubt, many of the those who have sent their resumes to the White House in search of a job threw their hands up in exasperation as they learned how the recent graduate with a half-page resume bounced from White House intern to White House employee, then Pentagon employee, eventually fielding job offers from the likes of Revlon.

That frustrating old adage will probably always hold true in some form or another. But the fact is that landing a government job is not the long shot you may think it is, even in this era of downsizing and outsourcing. Though it has shrunk by about 20 percent this decade, the federal government still employs about 300,000 to 400,000 people and hires about 1,000 new staffers each day.

About 12 percent of the total federal workforce is stationed inside the Beltway working at the Pentagon, on Capitol Hill and scores of other major and minor federal agencies.

While there is still more money to be made in the private sector, those who covet job security, reduced stress and great benefits may do well to take a second look at signing on with old Uncle Sam, according to Ron Krannich, author of the book "Find a Federal Job Fast."

"I know that there are a lot of people working in the private sector right now who are sick of constantly focusing on the bottom line," said Mr. Krannich.

"Many of these people would find their careers more rewarding if they felt they were making a contribution to the country."

But if you don't have an uncle who is a famous Senator, how are you going to find out what jobs are available?

The answer is simple - go on line. If you don't have a computer, buy one. If you can't afford one, borrow a friend's or find a library that has one.

If you can get on line and peruse a handful of Web sites, you will find out about every federal job that is available, when to apply and what forms to fill out. In some cases, you can even apply for the job on line and expect a response within days.

"Increasingly, federal applicants fall into two major categories - `the haves' and `have-nots,'" said Mr. …

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Let Uncle Sam's Web Sites Help You Find a Federal Job
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