Profile of Pinochet Appears before Arrest

By Grenier, Cynthia | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 24, 1998 | Go to article overview

Profile of Pinochet Appears before Arrest


Grenier, Cynthia, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Talk of interesting coincidences. The New Yorker last week featured a lengthy profile of Gen. Augusto Pinochet, including an interview conducted partly in London.

This week, headlines trumpeted the arrest of the former Chilean dictator in London at the request of Spanish authorities, who want to try the 83-year-old general for the torture and deaths of Spanish citizens in Chile.

The writer of the New Yorker piece, Jon Lee Anderson, tends to favor deceased socialist leader Salvador Allende, whom Gen. Pinochet overthrew in a coup d'etat.

Nonetheless, Mr. Anderson notes that Chile flourished under the Pinochet regime and that its economy became one of the most prosperous in South America.

Furthermore, he cites a U.N. report that rates the life expectancy, salaries, access to health services and educational standards in Chile as being higher than those of any other Latin American country.

True, in the dark days immediately after Gen. Pinochet's coup, some 3,000 Chileans "disappeared," many suffered imprisonment and torture, and many more chose to leave the country.

Taking into account the author's bias, the Anderson article nevertheless is a must-read.

The ever-exciting bimonthly the American Enterprise takes a fresh look at an old subject - race - and provides facts, statistics and articles to help you do some serious rethinking on this topic.

Editor Karl Zinsmeister in his Bird's Eye column writes, "The underlying premise that your race determines your status is false."

According to data from the University of Chicago's National Opinion Research Center, the gap between "haves" and "have-nots" "is much starker within white America than it is between average whites and average blacks," he writes.

He also reports that the incomes of black married couples are now within "a few percentage points of similar white couples."

Mr. Zinsmeister does not have many kind words for President Clinton and his "race initiative."

He ends his article by saying: "In the pages that follow we try to explore a tremendously consequential subject with honesty and seriousness. In the final report on Race in America that President Clinton has promised to present to the nation this December, you are, unfortunately, not likely to find much of either of those things."

Can you believe it? Ladies Home Journal has been around for 115 years. The November anniversary issue is sassy and fat with ads and features. To the credit of Editor-in-chief Myrna Blyth, there's nary a sleazy, innuendo-ridden cover line promoting sex. …

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