Commission Hate Crime Cottage Industry

By Roberts, Paul Craig | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 30, 1998 | Go to article overview

Commission Hate Crime Cottage Industry


Roberts, Paul Craig, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Hoax crimes are now a routine part of American college life. Minorities stage the hoaxes in order to take advantage of white guilt and get something that they want. In a recent issue of National Review, Jon Sanders of the Pope Center for Higher Education Reform relates some of the recent hoaxes.

At Duke University students hung a black doll and covered a campus landmark in black paint. As if on cue the handwringing began over racism at Duke and the urgency of a multicultural agenda. The incident turned out to be the brainchild of some black students who wanted to soften up the campus for a protest that they had in the works.

At Guilford College, the student senate president reported a racial attack on herself due to her support of black causes. The police concluded that the attack probably did not occur, but the alleged incident was sufficient to push the college into founding an institute on race relations, revising the curriculum and hiring more minority faculty.

Homosexuals have also become adept at staging "sympathy incidents." A homosexual resident adviser at the University of Georgia, later arrested for arson, made himself a victim of attack on three occasions by setting his door on fire. The Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Student Union used the incidents to pressure the university president to elevate their status with a faculty adviser.

At Eastern New Mexico University homophobic literature turned out to be the work of a lesbian teaching assistant, who was busy at work shaming the university into opening doors for lesbian advancement.

These college level hoaxes have now been mimicked by a national hoax - the Sept. 18 release of the President's Race Commission Report. The report is the product of an unbalanced commission representing only narrow special interests with a stake in preferences. It argues that blacks need a privileged status in law to offset social and economic privileges that the commission ascribes to white skin.

As blacks already enjoy special legal standing with quotas for university admissions, employment, promotion and government contracting, the Race Commission Report boils down to a demand that "affirmative action" be protected from California's Proposition 209 and from federal court decisions against reverse discrimination.

The Race Commission Report is an even more blatant attempt at manipulation of white guilt than the hoax perpetuated by the black students who staged the mock hanging. …

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