Head-to-Toe Pampering: Marble Fireplaces, Potomac Panoramas at Harborside

By Lerner, Michele | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 4, 1998 | Go to article overview

Head-to-Toe Pampering: Marble Fireplaces, Potomac Panoramas at Harborside


Lerner, Michele, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Pampering amenities are clearly an essential component of any luxury-level home, and certainly spectacular Potomac River views and Italian-marble fireplaces all qualify as amenities.

But the waterfront town house on the market at 16 Wolfe St. at Harborside in Alexandria offers something even more luxurious: toe warmers.

In the elegantly appointed master suite of this spectacular home, the marble master bath includes double vanities with heated toe-warmers at each sink for brisk fall and winter mornings. Clearly, there are other reasons to be ship with Miss Lewinsky, the president admitted that his, quote, "public comments about this matter gave a false impression." He said, "I misled people."

Mr. President, my immediate reaction to this statement that night it was delivered was deep disappointment and personal anger. I was disappointed because the president of the United States had just confessed to engaging in an extramarital affair with a young woman in his employ and to willfully deceiving the nation about his conduct.

I was personally angry because President Clinton had, by his disgraceful behavior, jeopardized his administration's historic record of accomplishment, much of which grew out of the principles and programs that he and I and many others had worked on together in the New Democratic movement.

I was also angry because I was one of the many people who had said over the preceding seven months that if the president clearly and explicitly denies the allegations against him, then of course I believe him.

Well, since that Monday night, I have not commented on this matter publicly. I thought I had an obligation to consider the president's admissions more objectively, less personally, and to try to put them in a clearer perspective. And I felt that I owed that much to the president for whom I have great affection and admiration and who I truly believed has worked tirelessly to make life tangibly better in so many ways for so many Americans.

But the truth is that after much reflection, my feelings of disappointment and anger have not dissipated, except now these feelings have gone beyond my personal dismay to a larger, graver sense of loss for our country, a reckoning of the damage that the president's conduct has done to the proud legacy of his presidency and ultimately an accounting of the impact of his actions on our democracy and its moral foundations.

The implications for our country are so serious that I feel a responsibility to my constituents in Connecticut as well as to my conscience to voice my concerns forthrightly and publicly, and I can think of no more appropriate place to do that than on this great Senate floor.

I've chosen to speak particularly at this time before the independent counsel files his report because while we do not know enough yet to answer the question of whether there are legal consequences of the president's conduct, we do know enough from what the president acknowledged on August 17th to answer a separate and distinct set of questions about the moral consequences for our country.

Mr. President, I have come to this floor many times in the past to speak with my colleagues about the concerns which are so widely shared in this chamber and throughout the nation that our society's standards are sinking, that our common moral code is deteriorating, and that our public life in coarsening. In doing so, I have specifically criticized leaders of the entertainment industry for the way they have used the enormous influence they wield to weaken our common values.

And now, because the president commands at least as much attention and exerts at least as much influence on our collective consciousness as any Hollywood celebrity or television show, it is hard to ignore the impact of the misconduct the president has admitted to on our culture, on our character and on our children. …

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