Clinton's Consequences

By Roberts, Paul Craig | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 14, 1999 | Go to article overview

Clinton's Consequences


Roberts, Paul Craig, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Clinton's consequences

Not long ago, a pundit wrote that Bill Clinton was the least consequential president in American history.

I know what he means. President Clinton has no positive achievements. His diplomacy is a failure. His domestic policies were rejected. He has no accomplishments.

But there is another way to view Mr. Clinton that suggests he is the most consequential of all presidents. Mr. Clinton has used the power of the presidency to legitimize immorality and illegality. He might even be the first president to commit treason against his country.

Mr. Clinton, with help from the media and liberal elites, has established that personal morality is no longer a requirement for being president of the United States. Adultery, sexual promiscuity and lying now bear the presidential seal of approval.

Parents who dismissed the charges against Mr. Clinton as "just about sex" will have a hard time holding their teen-agers and each other sexually accountable.

Mr. Clinton has established that perjury and obstruction of justice are not sufficient grounds for removing a president from office. These offenses might no longer be punished as felonies if the accused can convince a jury that he or she had a good reason for committing them.

Already, juries are experiencing difficulty convicting lesser lights of these charges. Julie Hiatt Steele got a hung jury on both counts, and Susan McDougall was not held accountable for refusing to testify under immunity about Whitewater loans.

Mr. Clinton might be the first president to commit treason. Apparently, Mr. Clinton received illegal campaign contributions from the Chinese government. In what could be a quid pro quo, the Clinton administration permitted the transfer of our nuclear missile technology to the Chinese. To complete the weapons package, the Clinton administration guarded our nuclear warhead technology with such lax security that the Chinese were able to steal it.

Mr. Clinton is using a totally politicized Justice Department to prevent an investigation and has bottled up Congress' own investigation by refusing to release the Cox report. Both Congress and the media have acquiesced to Mr. Clinton's refusal to be held accountable, further strengthening the precedent that the president is accountable only to polls.

Mr. Clinton is the first to turn the White House into a campaign operation, not only selling the Lincoln bedroom but also U.S. policy. Using an obscure law, Mr. Clinton made a national monument in Utah out of billions of dollars of non-polluting coal deposits. The direct benefactor was the Indonesian-Chinese Lippo Group - another source of Mr. Clinton's illegal campaign contributions - which owns the other major deposits of environmentally safe coal.

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