Womanly Politics, Manly War

By Grenier, Richard | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 8, 1998 | Go to article overview

Womanly Politics, Manly War


Grenier, Richard, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


At first glance it seems hardly logical. Here is Bill Clinton, by public reputation the most callous, conscienceless abuser of women in our national history, whose closet and even obscene intimacies with women have become a national scandal. He has often, moreover, treated his female sexual partners with open contempt.

And yet here he is the idol of women voters. Without the "women's vote" he's not likely to have been elected president of the United States, and he certainly wouldn't have been reelected in 1996. I'm speaking, of course, not of every single female in the United States but of the 10 percent, 15 percent, or on occasion even 25 percent of American women who constitute the celebrated "gender gap." These ladies have faithfully supported Clinton even through his sexual scandals, and bid fair to support a presidential candidate with similar ideology in the election of the year 2000.

But is this where we're headed? A country ruled by women (or their weak-kneed proxies)? This was farthest from the minds of the male supporters of the female suffrage amendment to the U. S. Constitution approved in 1920. And France, Germany and other great Continental military powers of recent times only gave women the vote after World War II (and in the Soviet Union no one of either gender voted). But Francis Fukuyama (he of "The End of History") has thrown another one of his bombshells into the intellectual world with "What if Women Ruled the World?", the lead, red-letter article in the new issue of Foreign Affairs.

In it he demonstrates, with abundant statistics, that the old feminist promise of a "world without war" is a substantially less hollow proposition than has been thought. Many feminists, indeed, contend that phenomena like aggression, violence and the intense competition for dominance are essentially masculine, and that the remorseless struggle for power associated with international politics are a "gendered perspective," describing the behavior of nations controlled by men. A world run by women, it seems, would be far more gentle.

The ongoing revolution in the study of life sciences has almost totally escaped the notice of much of the humanities and social sciences, particularly those concerned with feminism, postmodernism, cultural studies, and so on. A large majority of feminists are committed body and soul to the proposition that male and female are psychologically identical. Differences in behavior between men and women, consequently, are the result of social constructions passed on by the prevailing culture. Again and again American women have opposed military spending and the use of force.

Even today women oppose resisting a North Korean attack on our troops in the South, and would oppose by a large margin resisting Saddam Hussein if he were to invade Saudi Arabia. Indeed, our women have been conspicuously less supportive than men of the use of American military force to resist every tyrant from Adolf Hitler to Saddam Hussein, and it's probably thanks to women that we're at present totally without a missile defense system. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Womanly Politics, Manly War
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.