Lawmaker's Efforts on Survivors' Benefits Pay Off

By Fales, John | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 7, 1998 | Go to article overview

Lawmaker's Efforts on Survivors' Benefits Pay Off


Fales, John, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Dear Sgt. Shaft:

Thank you for spreading the good news in your June 1, 1998, column: The repeal of the 1990 law that denied surviving spouses of veterans who died from a service-connected disability their Department of Veterans Affairs Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC) if their subsequent marriage ends was long overdue.

As a member of the House committee that drafted the final version of this legislation, I was so pleased that my bill (H.R. 2004) was included in the larger transportation bill and that we were able to remove the inequity suffered by these surviving spouses.

Rep. Bob Filner, California Democrat

Dear Mr. Filner:

Kudos to you and to all the members of the House and Senate who labored and were successful in passing this equitable and deserving legislation. As you can see from the following letter, your job is just beginning.

We must ensure that these deserving Gold Star wives, who have given so much, are made whole. Military medical benefits should also be restored to them, and their DIC should be equal to other federal survivor benefits.

You also must be heartened by the VA fact sheet on DIC, also appearing in this column. It is vital to enlighten those eligible Gold Star gems about the restoration of their DIC benefits.

Dear Sgt. Shaft:

I was delighted to learn from your June 1, 1998, column that a bill has been introduced to restore Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC) to surviving spouses of veterans when such spouses have remarried and then lost their subsequent mate.

However, I am interested in how we can get this bill taken one step further - to allow continuance of benefits to surviving spouses who do not remarry until late in life; i.e., are older than, say, 65 when they remarry.

Enacting such a provision would correct a severe injustice to elderly surviving spouses who not only have lost their mates, but have lost all benefits for which they sacrificed so much to enable their deceased spouses to pursue a military career.

Only the Department of Veterans Affairs permanently cancels survivors' benefits to spouses who remarry regardless of their ages. For instance, the Department of Labor continues workers' compensation benefits to surviving spouses 60 or older who remarry, and civil service continues benefits to surviving spouses 55 or older who return to the altar. Even Social Security recipients 60 or older are not denied benefits if they elect to remarry.

Why can't the VA do likewise? Are veterans' spouses somehow considered less deserving?

A.B.R., Oakton

Dear A.B.R.:

As you can see in the above letter, I suspect that Rep. Filner and many of his colleagues will be made aware of your appeal for survivors' benefits equity.

SHAFT KUDOS

To Joe Thompson, VA undersecretary for benefits, for taking the sarge's recommendation and creating and highlighting the following fact sheet on DIC restoration:

Q: Following the death of my husband, who was killed in Vietnam, I remarried and my DIC payments were terminated. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Lawmaker's Efforts on Survivors' Benefits Pay Off
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.