U.S., Yugoslavia Trade War-Crime Accusations: Blame Each Other for Kosovo Horrors

By Skrlec, Jasminka | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 11, 1999 | Go to article overview

U.S., Yugoslavia Trade War-Crime Accusations: Blame Each Other for Kosovo Horrors


Skrlec, Jasminka, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


The United States and Yugoslavia yesterday accused each other of war crimes, with Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright presenting evidence of atrocities in Kosovo and Belgrade telling the World Court that NATO was guilty of genocide.

Yugoslavia's legal representative, Rodoljub Etinski, asked the court in The Hague to order a halt to the air strikes, which began March 24 to stop Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic from repressing majority ethnic Albanians in the southern province of Kosovo.

"The acts of bombing against Yugoslavia are not just illegal acts, they constitute a violation of human rights and genocide," Mr. Etinski said, claiming the air strikes violated international law.

Yugoslavia says more than 1,200 civilians have been killed so far in the NATO bombardments and 4,500 seriously injured. It has accused 10 countries, particularly United States and Britain, of bombing its territory in flagrant violation of the U.N. charter and other international treaties.

In Washington, Mrs. Albright spoke of execution, rape and ethnic cleansing by Serbian forces in Kosovo as she released a State Department report of atrocities in Kosovo.

"Horrific patterns of war crimes and crimes against humanity are emerging in Kosovo: systematic executions, organized rape and a well-planned program of terror and expulsion," Mrs. Albright told reporters.

More than 90 percent of ethnic Albanians have been expelled from their homes in Kosovo by Serbian forces and civilians, the report said.

There are reports of mass graves in six villages and in the Pagarusa Valley. Refugees say that Serbian forces systematically separated military-age men from their families. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

U.S., Yugoslavia Trade War-Crime Accusations: Blame Each Other for Kosovo Horrors
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.