The Slavic Three-Ring Caucus

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 30, 1999 | Go to article overview

The Slavic Three-Ring Caucus


The Russians have officialized another Slavic reunion just in time for this week's anti-US pep rally. As if it wasn't enough that Belarus and Russia revisited their unified past by forming a joint currency and parliament last month, Yugoslavian parliamentarians were awarded the status of permanent observers in the Russian-Belarussian assembly Thursday. Offering their hands to Yugoslavian President Slobodan Milosevic's government at a time when U.S. forces are poised to strike his country, the Slavic alliance had a few things to say about the American role in foreign policy.

"The United States has appropriated the right to take over the functions of international organizations," and the Slavs need to unite to fight it, Belarussian President Alexander Lukashenko told the combined parliament . He called the officializing of their three-ring caucus "historic" and necessary for the survival of the Slavic civilization.

Though it's been obvious that Russia is a faithful protector of Yugoslavia, the new union comes at a time when its president Slobodan Milosevic needs all the help he can get. As NATO forces wait near the Yugoslavian border for the word to strike Mr. Milosevic's Serbian forces, Russia openly disapproved of any attack, saying the possible bombings would cause the conflict to come to a stalemate. The Russian Foreign Ministry compared the situation with the airstrikes on Iraq, saying that use of force by the United States and Britain was also ineffective. …

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