SoulCafe Fosters Spiritual Rediscovery: Theology Dean Opens High-Tech Pastoral Retreat

By Vanderkam, Laura R. | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 28, 1998 | Go to article overview

SoulCafe Fosters Spiritual Rediscovery: Theology Dean Opens High-Tech Pastoral Retreat


Vanderkam, Laura R., The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Leonard Sweet, dean of the Drew University School of Theology, happened upon the God-and-cafe business by chance.

Driving through the scenic Canaan Valley, W.Va., a few years ago, Mr. Sweet remembers, "My soul was hijacked by the sense that somehow my destiny was caught up with this plot of planet Earth, where God did some of creation's finest artwork. So I managed to squeeze together three free hours to shop around for some property."

Soon, he was the new owner of a stretch of the valley, with no idea how he would pay for the purchase.

But after borrowing from banks, his friends and his pension fund, Mr. Sweet opened Sweet's Body and SoulCafe and Mountain Store in the old railroad and mining town of Thomas, W.Va., which has a population of 200.

The cafe is so high-tech, he says, it would be "cutting edge" even in New York City. Along with the standard cappuccino fare, it has Internet connections and a bookstore. Travelers can recharge their spiritual batteries in the beautiful mountain setting.

"The SoulCafe is a place of reflection where one can step back and ask how the soul is recovered," Mr. Sweet says. "After all, God gave us the mountain peaks as one of the soul's native habitats. It is here that perspective is regained and we realize God is near at hand to help us on our journey to spiritual wholeness."

Mr. Sweet's store is also the inspiration for his newest book, "A Cup of Coffee at the SoulCafe," a collection of meditations on spirituality and modern life. Packed with Bible verses and quotes from philosophers, Mr. Sweet's call for spiritual renewal pulls insights from family history, modern culture, music, sounds and smells.

He wrote the book to bring the message of the Gospel to those who are suspicious of organized religion but intrigued with spirituality.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

SoulCafe Fosters Spiritual Rediscovery: Theology Dean Opens High-Tech Pastoral Retreat
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.