DeLay Plays Bad China Politics

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 20, 1999 | Go to article overview
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DeLay Plays Bad China Politics


I was shocked to read "Power and principle," by Rep. Tom DeLay in the May 26 edition of your paper. Mr. DeLay's China-phobic, anti-Clinton article was a clear illustration of the dangerous direction in which the Republican Party is attempting to take our foreign policy.

Mr. DeLay claimed that a complete reversal in U.S. policy vis-a-vis China is needed now that we know, via the Cox report, that China has stolen U.S. nuclear technology. Mr. DeLay states that the "PRC government thinks it can walk all over the United States" because we have a "weak" leader. And why is President Clinton weak? Because "the president's known reputation for dishonesty has weakened the value of his word to the point where he has to repeat everything numerous times to convince anyone that he really means anything." Mr. DeLay, like much of his party, continues to confuse the president's personal life with his job performance. This is bad politics, as the last elections illustrated, as well as bad policy, as the current tensions between the United States and China indicate.

We do indeed have some problems with China. We should be concerned with their spying, as we should be concerned with any nation spying on us. If it is true that the Chinese have been successful in securing information because they are using an untraditional approach against which we have no barriers, then we must instruct our security agencies to develop barriers to Chinese espionage.

We should also be concerned about the response to the accidental bombing of the Chinese Embassy in Belgrade. While the bombing was a horrific, tragic incident, the government-sponsored violence on the ground against Americans and American property was disproportionate and not befitting the relations between our two nations.

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