Undeterred by Inquiry, Gore Helps Raise Funds for Beyer

By Cain, Andrew | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 4, 1997 | Go to article overview

Undeterred by Inquiry, Gore Helps Raise Funds for Beyer


Cain, Andrew, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Vice President Al Gore, under scrutiny for his own political fund raising, stepped into Virginia's race for governor last night, helping Democrat Donald S. Beyer Jr. raise $500,000.

Mr. Gore headlined a $10,000-per-couple dinner at the McLean home of Sen. Charles S. Robb, Virginia Democrat.

The Senate Governmental Affairs Committee today begins its inquiry into Mr. Gore's fund-raising efforts for his and President Clinton's 1996 re-election bid.

Meanwhile, House Speaker Newt Gingrich, Georgia Republican, tonight headlines a $5,000-to-$10,000 per-couple benefit for Republican gubernatorial nominee James S. Gilmore III at a Gilmore supporter's home in Potomac.

The high-profile forays into Virginia politics illustrate the national interest in the state's race as the lieutenant governor and former attorney general sprint for the finish with nine weeks to go before the election.

Virginia and New Jersey are the only two states holding elections for governor this year.

"Chuck Robb wanted to do something to help Don, and he called the vice president," said Page Boinest, a spokeswoman for Mr. Beyer.

Mr. Beyer fears no taint from the Clinton-Gore fund-raising scandal, the spokeswoman said.

Mr. Gore "is a sitting vice president who is willing to come in to help Don in his race," and Mr. Beyer "is proud to have him participate," she said.

"They were not seeking publicity for the vice president coming to Virginia. That speaks for itself," said Gilmore spokesman Mark Miner.

Neither campaign went out of its way to publicize its fund-raiser. The Beyer campaign may not view Mr. Gore as a strong asset - because of the scandal and because Virginia is a Republican state in presidential politics. Lyndon Johnson, in 1964, was the last Democratic nominee for president to carry the state.

But the Gilmore camp - holding its fund-raiser in Maryland - is not exactly showcasing Mr. Gingrich. Mr. Gilmore may be wary that photos of him and Mr. Gingrich together would make it easier for Mr. …

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Undeterred by Inquiry, Gore Helps Raise Funds for Beyer
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