Labor's Day, 1992

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 1, 1997 | Go to article overview
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Labor's Day, 1992


The following is excerpted from Executive Order 12800, in which President Bush implemented the Supreme Court's holding in Beck. The order is called "Notification of Employee Rights Concerning Payment of Union Dues or Fees."

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, in order to provide employees, labor organizations, and contracting employers with information concerning the rights of employees, and thereby to promote harmonious relations in the workplace for purposes of ensuring the economical and efficient administration and completion of Government contracts, it is hereby ordered as following:

Section 1. The Secretary of Labor ("Secretary") shall be responsible for the

administration and enforcement of this order. The Secretary shall adopt such rules and regulations and issue such orders as are deemed necessary and appropriate to achieve the purposes of this order. Sec. 2 (a) Except in contracts exempted in accordance with section 3 of this order, all Government contracting departments and agencies shall, to the extent consistent with law, include the following provisions in every Government contract, other than collective bargaining agreements as defined in 5 U.S.C. 7103(a)(8) and small purchase contracts governed by part 13 of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (48 C.F.R. 13.000-13.507), entered into, amended, renegotiated, or renewed, after the effective date of this order.

"1. During the term of this contract, the contractor agrees to post a notice, of such size and in such form as the Secretary of Labor may prescribe, in conspicuous places in and about its plants and offices, including all places where notices to employees are customarily posted. The notice shall include the following information (except that the last sentence shall not be included in notices posted in the plants or offices of carriers subject to the Railway Labor Act, as amended (45 U.

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