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AMA, Heartport Deliver Timely Reports on Medical World

By Szadkowski, Joseph | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 11, 1997 | Go to article overview

AMA, Heartport Deliver Timely Reports on Medical World


Szadkowski, Joseph, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


One of the most powerful uses of a World Wide Web site is to disseminate important medical information. A well-developed site provides instant communication of discoveries and theories to the public and medical industry.

The American Medical Association (http://199.186.22.101) provides a content-rich site for the medical industry, including its 300,000 members. The site provides information from medical science and education to advocacy and presents reports and press releases on steps the AMA is taking on behalf of the industry.

The AMA also has joined forces with Physicians' Online (http://www.po.com), a group dedicated to expanding physician access to the AMA Web resources.

"We are very pleased to be joining forces with Physicians' Online Inc., thereby providing physicians with the latest in interactive communications," said Dr. Richard F. Corlin, the speaker of the AMA's policy-making House of Delegates.

"The combination of the AMA Web site and our collaboration with POL will provide our members and the physician community with access to the most comprehensive package of on-line support and information from the AMA, empowering our members and enhancing our patient advocacy efforts."

For developers of medical technology, a Web site not only provides an information center, but helps to inform medical personnel, the public and investors on advances. The content creators of the recently launched Heartport Inc. site (http://www.heartport.com) have clearly exhibited how a Web site can serve informational and promotional purposes.

The Heartport site promotes the company's latest medical device, the Port-Access, which allows a heart surgeon to operate through small openings, or ports, in the chest wall between the ribs. This process eliminates one of the most painful aspects of open heart surgery: the opening of the chest and spreading of the rib cage to allow access to the heart.

"Minimally invasive heart surgery promises to have a major impact on patients with heart disease," said Dick Brewer, Heartport's chief operating officer. "We are pleased to provide a resource to inform and educate the public about heart disease and Port-Access' minimally invasive heart surgery as a new treatment alternative."

For those anticipating heart surgery for themselves or loved ones, the site provides understandable information on the process as well as links with more information about heart disease and heart surgery.

For medical personnel, the physician pages expand the information to offer details about the system and a list of physician links. Under Newsmakers, people interested in making a financial investment with Heartport can check out Nasdaq (http://www.nasdaq.com) stock quotations and read extensive financial reports in the Edgar database (http://www.sec.gov/cgi-bin/srch-edgar?0001009871).

Heartport's site takes full advantage of the medium. The site has some multimedia aspects, including RealAudio interviews with physicians, and communicates Heartport's marketing, investor and user information exceedingly well.

In total, the Heartport and AMA sites show how medical institutions and doctors are using the World Wide Web to spread information. Both sites provide important, outstanding communications to meet the needs of the medical community and the public through the instant power of the Internet.

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AMA, Heartport Deliver Timely Reports on Medical World
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