Close the D.C. School of Law

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 30, 1997 | Go to article overview
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Close the D.C. School of Law


Wouldn't it be great if the District, which has some fine universities and where city taxpayers fund a large, land-grant university, had a law school whose black students stood among America's most prominent legal minds? Maybe produce a Supreme Court justice? A D.C. mayor? Maybe even a renowned lawyer who has the ear of the president of the United States? Well, there is, and that law school is part of Howard University. As much as D.C. officials would like for the city's public law school to produce such outstanding public servants, the truth of the matter is it doesn't. In fact, the city has much to gain and little to lose by closing the doors to the D.C. School of Law.

The law school has stumbled on accreditation from the beginning. It was handed conditional accreditation from the American Bar Association early on, but that has been revoked at least twice. Officials today are still trying to convince the ABA the school is worthy of having it restored.

Why UDC officials are desperate to save the law school, which the D.C. government subsidizes to the tune of $2.3 million a year, yet trying to rid themselves of the hugely popular jazz station WDCU-FM, is baffling. Moreover, Jazz 90, unlike the law school, has never bitten the hand that feeds it. Whose interests are served at the law school?

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