Luguy in Pursuit of Art: French Artist Makes News in U.S

By Szadkowski, Joseph | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 10, 1996 | Go to article overview

Luguy in Pursuit of Art: French Artist Makes News in U.S


Szadkowski, Joseph, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


This is the 18th in an infinite series that profiles the elite of the comic book industry. This month we flake away the fastigial nucleus of Phillippe Luguy and ask him to:

GIVE US A PIECE OF YOUR MIND

Phillippe Luguy is a self-taught artist/illustrator long admired in Europe. He is now creating a stir in the American comic book market with his book "Percevan," distributed by Fantasy Flight Publishing. Born in 1948, Mr. Luguy began his artistic career at 18 after he returned from the armed services. His first strip, "Sylvio the Cricket," ran from 1974 until 1982 in Pif magazine. His first comic book (album), "Cyril and the Castle of One Thousand Diamonds," was released in 1977. Mr. Luguy has been a strip cartoonist, comic artist and does posters for shows and festivals and postcards.

Now available in the U.S. comic market, "Percevan" is available at better comic book stores or by calling Fantasy Flight at 800/773-8529.

Official title: Passionate artist. I think that no matter which artistic means one uses to express one's ideas, passion is the principle motive. It isn't, of course, constant from day to day - and inspiration isn't always present nor is the desire to put one's expressions down on paper.

Amount of time creating sequential art: My first publication was at the age of 18, upon my return from the navy that I began to live by this profession. When I count back, it's been 25 years since I started.

How I got into the business: At about 14 or 15 years old, I dreamed of becoming the "European Walt Disney" (youth knows no modesty!). At this period in my life, I met Paul Grimaud, a real French creator, producer of cartoons: "The King and the Bird," from the text of Jacques Prevert. He kindly received me, advised me and even proposed to let me perfect my work in his studios. Cartoons need an enormous amount of work and I wanted so much to see my characters live.

Current project: At the moment, I'm finishing a new adventure of Percevan, "The Black Arcantane." The album will be out in April 1996. I also draw many humorous postcards on various subjects: winter sports, the seaside, series of postcards for children or again, more romantic ones. I also create posters for book shows or cartoon festivals.

Sequential art project most glad to have been associated with: Generally, it's the next project that gives me the most pleasure. It's a moment of dreams, of hope once finished. I'm always disappointed with myself and can only find faults in the Percevan series, I have what you could call a preference for the album The Hour Glass of El Jerada. Probably because of the subject of the story (death) and also because the environment of the Arabian countries was very agreeable to draw.

Major differences between the European and American sequential art/comic books: The American market has an audience which largely crosses its frontiers, it's worldwide. Europe isn't ready yet. Its market still stays most of the time separated by the frontiers of the country of origin.

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