Ex-Aide Says She Didn't Leave FBI List

By Archibald, George | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 20, 1996 | Go to article overview

Ex-Aide Says She Didn't Leave FBI List


Archibald, George, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


A former White House security official yesterday disputed Clinton administration claims that she left behind an official list for FBI background checks containing names of more than 400 Republican officials who worked for Presidents Reagan and Bush.

Nancy Gemmell, who worked for six presidents before being replaced by D. Craig Livingstone as White House director of personnel security in August 1993, told a House panel that a Secret Service list she left her successors had only names of "current pass-holders."

"I did not know that another list existed," Mrs. Gemmell told the House Government Reform and Oversight Committee, which is investigating the matter. "The list was supposed to be active [White House employees] only."

Mrs. Gemmell testified that the list was "in the vault" of her office when she left the White House Aug. 13, before Anthony Marceca, an Army civilian employee and Democratic operative, joined the office to help Mr. Livingstone.

"We don't know how the list was generated, and that's what they [the FBI] are investigating," Mark Fabiani, special White House counsel, said after hearing of Mrs. Gemmell's testimony.

Meanwhile, the White House announced yesterday that Mr. Livingstone would be permanently replaced as White House security director by Charles C. Easley, a career security officer who has worked for the executive office of the president since October 1986.

Mr. Livingstone was put on paid administrative leave Monday amid probes of his yearlong effort to gather derogatory information from FBI files of former Republican White House aides.

FBI Director Louis J. Freeh, in his own initial report last week, accused the White House of committing "egregious violations of privacy" in searching the files.

Mrs. Gemmell and Jane Dannenhauer, her boss who retired in March 1993, said the names of former Bush administration White House officials not retained on the executive mansion's permanent staff were dropped from Secret Service pass-holder access lists when President Clinton took office Jan. 20, 1993.

Rep. Thomas M. Davis III, Virginia Republican, asked Mrs. Gemmell whether former Reagan counsel A.B. Culvahouse, who also testified yesterday, should have been named on the list used to search old FBI background files.

"No sir, it should not have been," she said.

"I did not consent for my file to be reviewed. It was inappropriate," Mr. Culvahouse said, without completion of a current Standard Form 86, "Questionnaire for National Security Positions."

Several Democrats on the panel accused Republicans of partisan politics in pursuing an issue that Mr.

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