Top Clinton Aide Called `Co-Conspirator': Lindsey Named by Prosecutors in Trial of 2 Arkansas Bankers

By Seper, Jerry | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 20, 1996 | Go to article overview

Top Clinton Aide Called `Co-Conspirator': Lindsey Named by Prosecutors in Trial of 2 Arkansas Bankers


Seper, Jerry, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


LITTLE ROCK, Ark. - White House Deputy Counsel Bruce Lindsey, President Clinton's closest adviser, has been named as an unindicted co-conspirator in the trial of two Arkansas bankers accused of illegally diverting cash to Mr. Clinton's 1990 gubernatorial campaign.

The surprise designation, which comes as a blow to a White House already reeling from successive scandals, means that Whitewater prosecutors - who brought the charges against the bankers - can focus on whether Mr. Lindsey was involved in criminal wrongdoing in the diversion of cash contributions to the Clinton campaign without filing formal charges or risk of successful objections of hearsay by defense lawyers.

In Washington, Mr. Lindsey vigorously denied any wrongdoing and said he would continue to work for Mr. Clinton. "I did not offer to resign. I did nothing wrong," he told a crowd of reporters in a White House driveway. "There was no purpose or reason for me to resign."

Mr. Clinton maintained his confidence in Mr. Lindsey. "He was thoroughly investigated and not charged, with ample opportunities," the president said. "I have got lots of confidence in him. I'm confident he didn't do anything wrong."

And the White House noted that Mr. Lindsey was not formally charged with any wrong-doing. "What is significant is that in many long months of inquiry he was not indicted," Press Secretary Michael McCurry said.

Mr. Lindsey's being named as a co-conspirator was confirmed yesterday by attorneys for the two bankers on trial here. "This is just another effort by the independent counsel's office to go out of its way to put the Clinton 1990 campaign on trial," said Dan Guthrie, who represents defendant Herbert Branscum Jr.

Naming Mr. Lindsey in the case means that the lawyer, a member of an old and prominent Little Rock law firm, a confidant and friend of Mr. Clinton's for more than 20 years, is expected to surface as a major player in the trial here of Mr. Branscum and his partner, Robert M. Hill, for which a jury is now being chosen. Mr. Lindsey last year was identified as a "target" of the Whitewater probe.

Mr. Branscum and Mr. Hill, who owned the Perry County Bank in Perryville, Ark., west of Little Rock, were indicted in February by a federal grand jury on fraud and conspiracy charges sought by Whitewater independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr.

The two men, along with the bank's president, Neil T. Ainley, are accused of taking illegally reimbursement for more than $13,200 in contributions they made to political campaigns between May 1990 and November 1993, including $7,000 that went to Mr. Clinton's gubernatorial re-election campaign in December 1990.

The indictment says Mr. Branscum and Mr. Hill raised the cash through false expense vouchers submitted to the bank for reimbursement and through a $3,000 cashier's check directly from bank funds.

Mr. Ainley was sentenced in January in a plea agreement with Mr. Starr to two years' probation and fined $1,000 for failing to report cash transactions during the 1990 campaign. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Top Clinton Aide Called `Co-Conspirator': Lindsey Named by Prosecutors in Trial of 2 Arkansas Bankers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.