Voinovich Exits Running-Mate List

By Kellman, Laurie | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 2, 1996 | Go to article overview
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Voinovich Exits Running-Mate List


Kellman, Laurie, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Ohio Gov. George V. Voinovich yesterday withdrew from Bob Dole's list of possible running mates, and Sen. John McCain was added as the GOP presidential candidate's vetting process entered its waning days.

"I feel that I owe it to the people of the state of Ohio to complete my job as governor," Mr. Voinovich, 60, said in Columbus. "And I also have to be very candid with you - that I would also like to be a member of the United States Senate."

A senior aide to Mr. Voinovich said the governor announced his decision three days after he settled on it. The move came after the Dole campaign's request for family information.

"I think he [Dole] really needs somebody that really wants to be vice president," the governor said.

The announcement came as little surprise to most Ohio politicos, who know the governor already has raised $1 million for his planned 1998 race for the Senate seat currently held by John Glenn.

No Republican has ever won a presidential election without earning Ohio's 21 electoral votes. Mr. Voinovich was the first governor to endorse Mr. Dole for the presidency. Dole campaign aides yesterday did not say whether Mr. Voinovich was a top contender on the list of potential running mates.

The eight remaining names on the list include three that were added this week: Sen. Connie Mack of Florida, Sen. Don Nickles of Oklahoma and Mr. McCain of Arizona, whose name was added Wednesday when Mr. Dole asked him to fill out a questionnaire and to submit to a background check.

"I am, of course, very flattered that a man of Senator Dole's caliber would even consider me for such an honor," Mr. McCain said in a statement.

Mr. McCain, 59, was national chairman of Texas Sen. Phil Gramm's unsuccessful campaign for the GOP presidential nomination.

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