If You Review All the Provisions, You Will See That This Gun Law Has Teeth

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 29, 1996 | Go to article overview

If You Review All the Provisions, You Will See That This Gun Law Has Teeth


In response to reporter Sean Scully's article "Gun law wide off the mark" (Oct. 1), pertaining to the Maryland Gun Violence Act of 1996, I would like you to consider the following facts:

* This law was written to have as little impact as possible on the "law abiding citizen."

* Prior to enactment of this law, there was no provision in the Maryland statute to prohibit "straw purchases."

* Maryland is the supplier of a majority of the guns used in crimes in Maryland. An example is that the Maryland State Police successfully traced 20 guns used in crimes between November 1995 and February 1996; of those, only two were in the hands of the original purchaser. Two were in the hands of a person with the same last name as the original purchaser, and 16 were in the hands of other persons. In the Project Lead study in Baltimore City from 1993 to 1995, 2,465 guns used in crimes were traced; only 60 were in the hands of the original purchaser. This is indicative of a thriving, unrestricted secondary-sales market in the state. The secondary-sales provision of this law, in conjunction with the one-gun-in-30-days provision, will reduce the availability of regulated firearms to prohibited persons in Maryland.

* The one-gun-in-30-days law in Virginia, enacted in July 1993, has been successful in reducing firearm trafficking from that state. According to a report completed by the Virginia State Crime commission this year, the Virginia law has disrupted the so-called "iron pipeline" of weapons used in criminal activity flowing from the Southeast along the Interstate 95 corridor to Northeastern states. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

If You Review All the Provisions, You Will See That This Gun Law Has Teeth
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.