Confederate Sons Welcome a Black Member: Joined `to Honor My Family History'

By Rosynsky, Paul T. | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 19, 1997 | Go to article overview

Confederate Sons Welcome a Black Member: Joined `to Honor My Family History'


Rosynsky, Paul T., The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


BALTIMORE - The Maryland Sons of Confederate Veterans inducted their first black member yesterday, three weeks after the state Motor Vehicle Administration banned the nonprofit organization's symbol, a Confederate battle flag, from members' vanity plates.

Anthony Cohen, 33, a historian from Silver Spring, was inducted along with six others during an annual birthday celebrations for Gens. Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee. Inductees were sworn in with a salute to the Confederate flag.

"I came to join the Sons of Confederate Veterans to honor my family history," said Mr. Cohen, as he stood in front a statue depicting Jackson and Lee riding on horseback at Johns Hopkins University. "I have been familiar with the Sons of Confederate Veterans for the last 30 years."

The flap over the group's symbol began three weeks ago when several prominent blacks in Maryland complained that the group's Confederate battle flag logo on the special MVA-issued license plates was offensive and promoted racism.

But Mr. Cohen disagrees.

Although hate groups use the Confederate flag as a hate symbol it does not represent racism, he said.

"I feel that African-Americans can clearly distinguish between symbols and people who bear the symbol," Mr. Cohen said. "It's time to look at people who bear the symbol."

Despite the recent flag flap, Sons of Confederate leader Patrick J. Griffin III, said the induction was not an attempt to highlight the group's fight for the use of their symbol.

"We had a number of people to induct, [and] we felt it would be appropriate to induct them here than at a normal camp meeting," Mr. Griffin said.

New members were inducted before a small crowd of supporters who came to pay tribute to the generals. The ceremony followed a re-enactment of a Confederate Army march and a salute to the Confederate flag.

In order to join the 101-year-old organization, applicants must prove they have a descendant who fought for the Confederacy. About 25,000 active members belong to 600 camps - or chapters - across the country, one camp in Europe and one in Brazil. The Maryland division has about 450 members, Mr. Griffin said.

Mr. Cohen is not the first black in the national organization. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Confederate Sons Welcome a Black Member: Joined `to Honor My Family History'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.