High Court Rejects Appeal by Firm to Retain Drug Dealer's Legal Fees

By Murray, Frank J. | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 22, 1997 | Go to article overview

High Court Rejects Appeal by Firm to Retain Drug Dealer's Legal Fees


Murray, Frank J., The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


The Supreme Court refused yesterday to help an Alexandria law firm keep a $103,800 fee paid by a client who pleaded guilty to cocaine trafficking.

In a decision that could discourage many lawyers from taking certain kinds of clients, justices turned down the firm's appeal of the Justice Department's aggressive efforts to recover narcotics traffickers' profits.

William P. Covington hired Moffitt, Zwerling & Kemler in August 1991 and paid the firm in cash, although the defense lawyers denied his claim that $86,800 was delivered "stuffed in a shoe box or Ritz cracker box." He was indicted months later and cut a plea bargain to give his property and "unstinting efforts" to help the government recoup the legal fees, which were long spent.

Former firm partner John Zwerling reacted to the defeat yesterday by saying the burden put on law firms "is almost impossible to meet" and interferes with an accused person's right to counsel. A court found the law firm had "a subjective belief the fee was legitimate money," he said, but could not say the firm had "no reason to believe" the money was the fruit of crime. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

High Court Rejects Appeal by Firm to Retain Drug Dealer's Legal Fees
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.