Town Car's Features Make It Last of the Big U.S. Luxury Cars

By Aukofer, Frank | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 24, 1997 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Town Car's Features Make It Last of the Big U.S. Luxury Cars


Aukofer, Frank, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Call it a dinousaur, an anachronism, a throwback. They all apply to the 1997 Lincoln Town Car.

It's the last of a breed of giant American luxury sedans with rear-wheel drive and V- engines. When General Motors dropped its rear-drive Cadillac Fleetwood, it left the Town Car out there all by itself.

Its styling is dated, more boxy than sleek, there's not a great deal of sophistication in its underpinnings, and it's not even terribly expensive as luxury cars go these days.

The tested top-line Cartier version, fully loaded, came in at under $45,000. While that's likely out of reach for the masses, there are whole bunches of other luxury cars that cost much more.

But know what? When you show up in a Town Car, you get respect. There's instant deference from hotel doormen, valet parking attendants and even casual passers-by.

Likely it's because the Town Car epitomizes entrenched American notions of what a luxury car is all about.

Pick it apart, and it doesn't come off all that terrific. It's ponderous, requiring generous space to park, the suspension system loses its cool on bad roads, and the handling and acceleration don't match up to some moderately priced family cars.

But if you're facing a long trip on smooth interstate highways without too many curves and hills, there's almost nothing better than a big old Lincoln Town Car.

You settle into large sofalike seats, crank up the CD player, set the climate control on automatic, punch the cruise control and settle back in quiet, stretched-out comfort. If it's a chilly day, you can even dial up the tush and back warmers built into the front and rear seats.

Out behind, there's a 22-cubic-foot trunk, enough to swallow everything four persons might need for a week on the road, including golf clubs and tennis rackets.

And although it probably doesn't matter much, it doesn't kill you at the gas pump.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Town Car's Features Make It Last of the Big U.S. Luxury Cars
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?