Introducing a Splendid Exhibition

By Geracimos, Ann; Dean, Mensah | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 24, 1997 | Go to article overview

Introducing a Splendid Exhibition


Geracimos, Ann, Dean, Mensah, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Glitz of an entirely different kind, concept and culture - light years away from modern inaugural pageantry - graced the National Gallery of Art Tuesday. A pity that staff and sponsors couldn't sell tickets for the show.

A gala reception for the East Wing's current blockbuster exhibit, "The Splendors of Imperial China," began with an "Auspicious Blessing Ceremony" featuring an ancient Chinese dragon dance performed by students from Wheaton's Tai Yim Kung Fu School and included a buffet with dishes from the 18th-century imperial era.

Gallery trustee Louise Whitney Mellon opened the evening by giving the dragon a red envelope containing currency and a leaf of bok choy, which the dragon ritually chews and spits out. This is said to bring good luck and is a main attraction at all prestigious Chinese events, which this most certainly was.

The occasion, like the exhibit itself, was way over the top in aesthetic appeal and with a heavy-duty guest list high on ambassadors, top contributors and institutional heads.

The 476 pieces chosen from Taipei's National Palace Museum's holdings of some 700,000 works of art mark only the third time that the Western public has been able to view any part of the collection. In the words of Philippe de Montebello, director of New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art, where the exhibit originated, viewers are treated to "an unsurpassed view of Chinese civilization's evolution from its inception through the 18th century."

The exhibit is important back home as well "because people in Taiwan have not realized that what we own is appreciated by the world," Jason Hu, Taipei's economic and cultural representative, said in a private moment. "It's great to share part of Chinese civilization; normally you keep everything in your museum. These are only a few treasures on display."

Students moved rhythmically underneath a colorful dragon costume while others played drums, cymbals and a gong, leading guests from the National Gallery's central court down the grand staircase to the exhibit's entrance where formal remarks were offered by Chin Hsiao-yi, director of the National Palace Museum, Earl "Rusty" Powell III, director of the National Gallery, and Mr. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Introducing a Splendid Exhibition
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.