Opening Salvos on NATO

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 24, 1997 | Go to article overview

Opening Salvos on NATO


Relations between Russia and the Western World will reach a critical stage over the next six months. This period will see intense negotiations over the future of the NATO alliance, which is set to announce new candidates for membership at a summit meeting in July. NATO members have adamantly denied Russia any say over the rights of NATO to add new members or indeed the rights of aspiring countries, such as Poland, Hungary or the Czech Republic, to join. This is a question of sovereignty and the right of sovereign governments to make decisions. But that does not mean that the Russians might not still be able cause mischief, delay or even failure. All the more the reason for Western leaders to steel themselves at this time. As Mrs. Thatcher memorably told George Bush before the Gulf War, "this is no time to go wobbly."

The task will not be made any easier by the precarious state of health of Russian President Boris Yeltsin, who after undergoing heart surgery came down with pneumonia. This week, Mr. Yeltsin's communist enemies in the Russian parliament, the Duma, attempted to force a vote to oust him, only to find that Mr. Yeltsin had apparently risen from his sick bed to travel to the Kremlin for a meeting with Prime Minister Victor Chernomyrdin. There were no cameras present, however, and exactly what went on, if anything, is now a matter of much speculation. Meanwhile two of Mr. Yeltsin's foremost rivals, retired Gens. Alexander Lebed and Alexander Rutskoi, turned up here in the United States, looking to establish connections and support for the leadership struggle ahead.

The most important meeting of the week, however, was the first formal meeting between NATO Secretary General Javier Solana and Russian Foreign Minister Yevgeni Primakov at a guest house on the outskirts of Moscow. The subject of their discussion was a "charter" NATO has agreed to negotiate with Russia defining NATO-Russia relations in connection with the proposed expansion of the organization. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Opening Salvos on NATO
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.