Kuwaiti Christian to Battle in Court for Civil Rights, Life

By Carter, Tom | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 16, 1996 | Go to article overview

Kuwaiti Christian to Battle in Court for Civil Rights, Life


Carter, Tom, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Robert Hussein, a Kuwaiti convert to Christianity, goes on trial in civil court in Kuwait City tomorrow for apostasy - abandonment of Islam.

If convicted, he faces the forced dissolution of his marriage and the loss of certain civil rights, including the right to see his children.

He fears that some Muslims would interpret a guilty ruling as permission to kill him because there is no punishment for killing an apostate of Islam.

Among Muslim theologians in the Middle East, there is agreement that abandoning Islam is punishable by death.

Because of death threats, Mr. Hussein never spends more than a few days at any location.

"I am an alien in my own country," Mr. Hussein, 45, said by telephone Friday from a safe house in Kuwait. "For me, between Saddam Hussein and this government, there is no difference. I was a prisoner under Saddam. I am still a prisoner."

Mr. Hussein, who changed his name from Hussein Qamber Ali, has not seen his son and daughter, ages 4 and 6, in six months. His wife refuses to speak with him. His father died in December, and the family forbade him to attend the funeral.

His brother has taken control of the family construction business, a firm he once ran.

He has been denounced in the Kuwaiti parliament, mosques and newspapers. He said he cannot even find a lawyer to defend him. One asked for $1 million to represent him.

Fifteen members of Congress - including Nancy Pelosi, California Democrat, and Doug Bereuter, Nebraska Republican - have signed a letter to the emir of Kuwait, Sheik Jabir al-Ahmad al-Jabir al-Sabah, requesting information on the case.

There has been no answer.

"It seems to me that the United States, which liberated Kuwait, ought to have some influence there," said Frank Calzon of the human rights organization Freedom House. "The United States ought to be doing everything possible to prevent this type of outrage."

A State Department source said the United States is closely monitoring the case and "has done something" to register official interest with the Kuwaiti government. The source would not elaborate on what steps have been taken.

A spokesman for former President George Bush in Houston said Mr. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Kuwaiti Christian to Battle in Court for Civil Rights, Life
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.