Probes Will Go on, Says Burton

By Archibald, George | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 7, 1996 | Go to article overview

Probes Will Go on, Says Burton


Archibald, George, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


The White House yesterday asked congressional Republicans to put a season of scandal probes behind them, but the incoming chairman of the House's major investigative committee said the probes will continue - and likely expand.

"Nobody's above the law," said Rep. Dan Burton, Indiana Republican, who soon will become chairman of the House Government Reform and Oversight Committee.

"We're going to be diligent in finding out if there was wrongdoing and if anyone should be prosecuted," said the eight-term congressman, who will succeed retiring Rep. William F. Clinger of Pennsylvania as the panel's chairman.

"We're not going on any witch hunts for political purposes. All we want to do is find out if there was wrongdoing."

Mr. Burton said he will expand the probe of the White House's improper acquisition of more than 900 FBI files of presidential appointees in the Reagan and Bush administrations to determine whether federal tax returns also were improperly obtained by White House officials from the IRS.

"I want the Internal Revenue Service commissioner to appear to testify. It's my intention to find out if any tax records were given to the White House without authority" from individual taxpayers, the congressman told The Washington Times in an interview yesterday.

White House Chief of Staff Leon E. Panetta reacted to President Clinton's re-election and continued Republican control of both houses of Congress by asking for an end to attacks on the administration's ethics.

"The American people have really rejected four years of those kinds of allegations that led nowhere," Mr. Panetta said of successive congressional probes of the Whitewater land-development scandal in Arkansas, the White House travel office firings and the FBI files affair.

"If we bog down in the kind of gridlock and partisanship and attacks that we saw over the past two years, I think people will reject that," Mr. Panetta said yesterday on NBC-TV's "Today" show.

Mr. Clinton, aboard Air Force One, also characterized GOP investigations as not "fruitful" and said they have not been "politically productive."

Some staunch critics may agree that Congress should forgo more hearings.

Sen. Alfonse D'Amato, who chaired 60 days of tumultuous hearings by a special Whitewater committee, said yesterday that Congress should now forget about further investigations of Mr. Clinton.

"It seems to me we should leave that in the hands of the special prosecutor and not be attempting to substitute our judgment," the New York Republican said in a news conference.

In the weeks leading up to Tuesday's national elections, Republican leaders in the House and Senate{D-} launched a massive investigation of foreign money given to the Clinton re-election campaign and the Democratic Party in the wake of media disclosures that a friend of the president's raised millions of dollars from Asian businessmen. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Probes Will Go on, Says Burton
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.