Division Report Family and Consumer Sciences Education

By Blassingame, Kelley | Techniques, October 1999 | Go to article overview

Division Report Family and Consumer Sciences Education


Blassingame, Kelley, Techniques


* Register Now for AAFCS 2000 Meeting

The American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences (AAFCS) will hold its first annual meeting of the millennium, "Invest in Families: Utilizing Emerging Technology," next June 24-27 in Chicago. The annual meeting is an opportunity for FACS professionals to network with colleagues and expand their knowledge and skills base.

The AAFCS meetings department also is accepting program proposals for educational sessions, special functions and pre- or post-conferences for the 2000 meeting. Proposals must be postmarked by Oct. 1.

To submit a proposal or to register, call the AAFCS meetings department at 800-424-8080. Or visit www.aafcs.org.

* Magazine Honors Iowa State Faculty Member

Bobbin Magazine, an apparel manufacturers' trade publication, named its 1998 Teacher of the Year at the International Textiles and Apparel Association annual conference in Dallas last November.

Ruth Glock, a faculty member in the Department of Textiles and Clothing at Iowa State University, was presented with the award, which recognizes contributions through teaching, research or service to the long-term success of the apparel industry.

Glock has been a member of the ISU faculty for 21 years, and serves on the Board of Directors of the Iowa Textiles and Apparel Association. She also is the author of Apparel Manufacturing: Sewn Products Analysis, a textbook used at more than 90 colleges and universities worldwide, as well as by apparel manufacturers.

Change is in the Air

In May of last year, the first-ever national standards for family and consumer sciences (FACS) education were introduced at the first Assembly of States, sponsored by the American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences, in Indianapolis, Ind. Since then, FACS educators having been working to put the new standards into practice in their home states.

Missouri: Last spring, a state curriculum project aligned the cognitive level of the Missouri core competencies with the national standards. FACS teacher educators have offered courses to practicing teachers that focus on using critical thinking and problem solving with the new standards. Missouri FACS teachers also have worked toward familiarizing others in the community--such as parents and business leaders--with the new standards.

New Mexico: The state department of education and the FHAHERO director conducted a series of statewide workshops on the national standards last October. Teachers expressed a need for the new curriculum to be well-planned, sequential and assessable, so officials began changes by specifying and defining the FACS courses already listed by the state's education department.

Officials have enlisted the help of postsecondary institutions to design the new curriculum and create partnerships for the future. …

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