Hitting the College Exams Students Increasingly Taking More Chances

By MacDonald, Mary | The Florida Times Union, January 17, 1998 | Go to article overview

Hitting the College Exams Students Increasingly Taking More Chances


MacDonald, Mary, The Florida Times Union


The stress of taking a national college entrance exam has become

routine to Natalle Logan, a senior at Stanton College

Preparatory School.

By the time she graduates this year, Logan expects to have

taken the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) and American College

Testing Assessment (ACT) nearly 10 times.

The 17-year-old already has been accepted at her favorite

colleges, but she continues to compete for scholarship money. If

she can raise her scores with another few rounds of testing, so

be it.

"I don't test very well," she said. "I just think it's kind of

unfair to have that as your [evaluation]."

Her endurance is not unusual.

Little more than a decade ago, most college-bound students in

Jacksonville took the SAT two or three times. Today, prospective

undergraduates increasingly take a round or two of both national

tests, a recognition that they measure different skills.

The number of Jacksonville high school seniors taking the SAT

increased 6 percent from 1995 to 1997, from 2,147 to 2,275,

while the number taking the ACT climbed 16 percent, from 1,417

to 1,651.

The gains were even more substantial among African-American

students.

The number of African-American seniors who took the ACT rose

from 427 to 505 over the two years, an 18 percent increase. The

number of students taking the SAT jumped from 434 to 591, a 36

percent gain.

The purpose of both exams is to assess the ability of high

school students to perform in college, but whether they

adequately do so is the subject of national debate.

The SAT has come under scrutiny for underestimating the

potential of poor students, as well as African-Americans,

Hispanics and women.

Some African-American students, like Logan, say they have heard

they should take the ACT because they can achieve a higher

score. But the benefit appears to be a perceived one.

As a whole, African-American students in Jacksonville appear to

do about the same on the two tests, said Laurel Anderson,

director of guidance services for the Duval County schools.

For the record, the school system encourages all high school

students to take both tests. But guidance counselors undoubtedly

follow the national media, which has focused criticism on the

SAT more so than the ACT, Anderson said.

The SAT, which remains the dominant test in Jacksonville,

Florida and the nation, measures critical thinking, reasoning

and other skills. Although it is no longer called an aptitude

test, it does not specifically cover high school subject matter.

By comparison, the ACT closely mirrors curriculum. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Hitting the College Exams Students Increasingly Taking More Chances
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.