How Old Is Old? Florida Says It's No. 75; Not Georgia

By Hayes, Matt | The Florida Times Union, October 30, 1997 | Go to article overview

How Old Is Old? Florida Says It's No. 75; Not Georgia


Hayes, Matt, The Florida Times Union


The plans were in the early stages when Mike Sullivan made calls

to the respective schools.

It seemed logical enough. The 75th anniversary of the

Georgia-Florida game deserved a 75th anniversary celebration.

Bad move -- that is, from Georgia's point of view.

Good move, though, if you're in the Florida camp.

"We were going to have a big 75th anniversary celebration,"

said Sullivan, director of Jacksonville's Sports Development

Authority. "After a couple of phone calls, we realized that was

obviously not the thing to do."

Ah, the beauty of a rivalry. Here in the World's Largest

Cocktail Party, they take it one step further.

These guys can't even agree when the series began. Georgia says

the rivalry started with a game in 1904, won -- of course -- by

the Bulldogs, 52-0. That means this year's game would be the

76th edition.

Florida says the rivalry began in 1915, that the 1904 game was

played by a club team and not the official University of Florida

football team. That means this year's game would be the 75th

anniversary.

One thing's for sure: Georgia won the first game of the series,

whether it's 1904 or the Bulldogs' 37-0 victory in 1915. The

rivalry has been played annually since, with intermittent breaks

in the early years.

"We are not revisionist historians," said Norm Carlson,

associate athletic director of communications at Florida, and

longtime Gator publicist. "Georgia has a different version. If

they wanted to do a 75th anniversary celebration, they should've

done it last year. But we're doing it this year."

The basis of Florida's argument, Carlson says, is the formation

of the university in 1906. That's when the state legislature

passed the Buckman Act, moving all of the satellite campuses

around the state to the city of Gainesville and officially

recognizing the University of Florida.

That was also when the university's official sports records

begin. In fact, there is still a dormitory on campus today named

after Buckman.

All that, though, means little to the Bulldogs. The 1904 game

in the Georgia record books still states Georgia 52, Florida 0.

"That's part of the history and tradition that neither can

agree on that," Sullivan said. "We're not really celebrating

anniversary. We're celebrating it being in Jacksonville."

THROUGH THE YEARS

1904 Georgia 52, Florida 0

1915 Georgia 39, Florida 0

1916 Georgia 21, Florida 0

1919 Georgia 16, Florida 0

1920 Georgia 56, Florida 0

1926 Georgia 32, Florida 9

1927 Georgia 28, Florida 0

1928 Florida 26, Georgia 6

1929 Florida 18, Georgia 6

1930 Florida 0, Georgia 0

1931 Georgia 33, Florida 6

1932 Georgia 33, Florida 12

1933 Georgia 14, Florida 0

1935 Georgia 7, Florida 0

1936 Georgia 26, Florida 8

1937 Florida 6, Georgia 0

1938 Georgia 19, Florida 6

1939 Georgia 6, Florida 2

1940 Florida 18, Georgia 13

1941 Georgia 19, Florida 3

1942 Georgia 75, Florida 0

1944 Georgia 38, Florida 12

1945 Georgia 34, Florida 0

1946 Georgia 33, Florida 14

1947 Georgia 34, Florida 16

1948 Georgia 20, Florida 12

1949 Florida 28, Georgia 7

1950 Georgia 6, Florida 0

1951 Georgia 7, Florida 6

1952 Florida 30, Georgia 0

1953 Florida 21, Georgia 7

1954 Georgia 14, Florida 13

1955 Florida 19, Georgia 13

1956 Florida 28, Georgia 0

1957 Florida 22, Georgia 0

1958 Florida 7, Georgia 6

1959 Georgia 21, Florida 10

1960 Florida 22, Georgia 14

1961 Florida 21, Georgia 14

1962 Florida 23, Georgia 15

1963 Florida 21, Georgia 14

1964 Georgia 14, Florida 7

1965 Florida 14, Georgia 10

1966 Georgia 27, Florida 10

1967 Florida 17, Georgia 16

1968 Georgia 51, Florida 0

1969 Florida 13, Georgia 13

1970 Florida 24, Georgia 17

1971 Georgia 49, Florida 7

1972 Georgia 10, Florida 7

1973 Florida 11, Georgia 10

1974 Georgia 17, Florida 16

1975 Georgia 10, Florida 7

1976 Georgia 41, Florida 27

1977 Florida 22, Georgia 17

1978 Georgia 24, Florida 22

1979 Georgia 33, Florida 10

1980 Georgia 26, Florida 21

1981 Georgia 26, Florida 21

1982 Georgia 44, Florida 0

1983 Georgia 10, Florida 9

1984 Florida 27, Georgia 0

1985 Georgia 24, Florida 3

1986 Florida 31, Georgia 19

1987 Georgia 23, Florida 10

1988 Georgia 26, Florida 3

1989 Georgia 17, Florida 10

1990 Florida 38, Georgia 7

1991 Florida 45, Georgia 13

1992 Florida 26, Georgia 24

1993 Florida 33, Georgia 26

1994 Florida 52, Georgia 14

1995 Florida 52, Georgia 17

1996 Florida 47, Georgia 7

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