Tobacco Trial Nears End Jury Deliberation Possible Saturday

By Bell, June D. | The Florida Times Union, April 30, 1997 | Go to article overview

Tobacco Trial Nears End Jury Deliberation Possible Saturday


Bell, June D., The Florida Times Union


A closely watched trial against a tobacco company should end

this week, attorneys said yesterday after a day of testimony

that included a chorus of the 1940s hit song Smoke, Smoke, Smoke

That Cigarette.

Attorneys for R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., defending itself in

the Jacksonville wrongful-death trial, said they'll finish their

case today. The trial is in its fourth week.

Jurors will hear four hours of closing arguments Friday morning

and could deliberate Saturday, Circuit Judge Bernard Nachman

said. He'll ask the six jurors today if they're available

Saturday.

The trial's length has already exceeded the judge's

expectations. When the jurors were selected April 8, Nachman

assured them the case would last two to three weeks.

During deliberations, jurors will review stacks of complex

medical and scientific testimony to help them decide whether

Reynolds should be held responsible for the death of Jean

Connor.

The Jacksonville woman smoked two to three packs of Reynolds

brand cigarettes a day for 22 years. When she died of cancer in

1995 at age 49, her younger sister, Dana Raulerson, pursued the

lawsuit on behalf of her late sister's estate.

Reynolds attorneys claim Connor wasn't addicted because she

stopped smoking the first time she tried: in 1993, shortly

before she felt a lump in her neck that was cancerous. She, like

everyone else, knew cigarettes had health risks but chose to

continue smoking, they said.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Tobacco Trial Nears End Jury Deliberation Possible Saturday
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.