Some Adult Pleasures Not Worth the Ride

By Longenecker, Bill | The Florida Times Union, October 23, 1996 | Go to article overview

Some Adult Pleasures Not Worth the Ride


Longenecker, Bill, The Florida Times Union


Columnists rarely solve problems with words. The pen may be

mightier than a sword, but don't use it against a mugger.

(Threaten the mugger with a future column.)

Drug use is up among the young. But adults use the two drugs on

the planet that kill the most people. Alcohol and tobacco kill

about 25 times more people than all of the illegal drugs

combined. If alcohol were a newly developed drug seeking

approval for legal usage, it would face rejection based on its

side effects and potential for abuse.

We need to be honest with children. People use drugs because

they enjoy the effects. Penicillin helps people feel better by

killing germs. Alcohol hides pain for many. It has an ancient

history as a social lubricant.

Jesus lent credibility by changing water to wine. A component

in wine has proved to be of value in protecting some from heart

disease. (It is also present in grape juice.) Alcohol

consumption is a sacred right worshiped at parties and sports

events. It is a drug with positive and negative side effects.

We expect children to wait until they are "old enough" to enjoy

the privilege of drinking or having sex. These are "adult

pleasures." Then, we applaud a child's adult-level athletic

performance. A mixed message? Children rarely see the

distinction that some adult things are fine, others aren't.

During a recent mountain bike race at Hanna Park, I talked with

a fascinating woman from Hilton Head Island, S.C., Kathy Moore.

She is active in drug-abuse prevention in her area's schools.

Two years ago, her son, Tim, and his best friend got involved

in a very esoteric bike ritual called observed trials. Their

competition was being held the same day at Hanna Park. It is a

bicycle ballet through a maze of ramps and picnic tables. Total

bike control and accuracy are scored, not speed. Contestants

must complete several untimed runs in a four-hour period.

When Tim was riding, mountain bikers stopped, suddenly

captivated by the moves of this young man.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Some Adult Pleasures Not Worth the Ride
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.