ACOG Closing Up Shop Olympic Committee Completes Mission

By LoMonte, Frank | The Florida Times Union, September 16, 1996 | Go to article overview

ACOG Closing Up Shop Olympic Committee Completes Mission


LoMonte, Frank, The Florida Times Union


ATLANTA -- Call it the ultimate in corporate downsizing: A $1.7

billion downtown employer that will suddenly vanish within a

year.

But unlike other down-spiraling companies, this one isn't

hustling to turn around a sales slump or re-tool the product.

It's fire sale time at the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic

Games and everything, 600 employees included, must go.

"There's a big letdown. It's kind of sad," said Doris

Isaacs-Stallworth, the committee's managing director for

personnel, a 3 1/2-year veteran who will be among the last to

depart.

"While people are very happy and proud we completed a

successful event, they build relationships that are now coming

to an end," said Isaacs-Stallworth. "Because of the unique

objective everybody was working toward, there was a unique type

of bonding. It's kind of sad when you see the furniture being

taken away."

At one time the home of 4,000 paid employees, the committee is

down to a virtual skeleton crew. By the end of September, the

work force will stand at about 400, with fewer than half of them

left at year's end.

The two floors the committee still occupies in a downtown

office building percolate with a different type of activity,

lacking some of the formality and the breakneck pace of

pre-Olympic preparations. Still, formidable jobs remain:

Converting the oval-shaped Olympic stadium into a 48,000-seat

circular ballpark for the Atlanta Braves, which will require

demolishing about half the current structure and then putting

the pieces back together.

Publishing a multi-volume final report to the International

Olympic Committee, a detailed history of the Atlanta Games that

will serve as a guide for future Olympic organizers. Atlanta's

report will be sold to the public for the first time, one final

moneymaker for the most marketed Games ever.

Squaring revenues with expenses, and deciding what to do with

any leftover money, with a permanent Olympic museum among the

suggested uses.

The committee is negotiating with NBC-TV on a $15-million-plus

payment as Atlanta's share of a windfall of unexpected ad sales.

Final payments from food vendors remain to be settled, and the

committee also expects millions more from post-Games souvenir

sales and the sale of "intellectual property" such as mailing

lists.

The man in charge of dismantling the Olympics is Patrick

Glisson, a former Atlanta city finance director, who was part of

Billy Payne's Olympic bid team and one of the Olympic

committee's first hires.

He expects the job to take at least nine more months, with the

final report, the last task to be completed, not ready until the

end of 1997.

"We are on what I would call an orderly glide path down," said

Glisson, who, like Isaacs-Stallworth, said he has no job lined

up.

One of the biggest headaches has been recovering cellular

phones, beepers and even automobiles from the thousands of

employees who leave, then bargaining with Olympic sponsors over

who'll pay for damaged or missing property. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

ACOG Closing Up Shop Olympic Committee Completes Mission
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.