Unions Take on China

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 19, 1999 | Go to article overview

Unions Take on China


The AFL-CIO feels betrayed by President Clinton. Within weeks after the 13-million-member labor federation enthusiastically endorsed the presidential candidacy of Vice President Al Gore, Mr. Clinton's hand-picked, designated successor, the Clinton administration signed an agreement with communist China that will pave the way for China to become a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO), the international body that writes the rules for trade and adjudicates disputes between its members.

Admitting China, a notorious abuser of labor rights, to the WTO is anathema to the AFL-CIO. The federation feels particularly bitter over this development because only last January, in his State of the Union message, Mr. Clinton promised that the United States would work to "put a human face on the global economy." Thus, the AFL-CIO has committed itself to convincing a majority of House members to reject the agreement.

China's reprehensible labor policies clearly violate the norms of acceptable international behavior. The AFL-CIO is right to be repulsed. But the place to hold China accountable for its despicable behavior is not the WTO, where the AFL-CIO's complaints are viewed throughout the developing world as a blatantly protectionist gambit designed to thwart the comparative advantage lower wages offer emerging markets.

The place to deal with China's abhorrent labor record is the International Labor Organization (ILO), a U.N.-affiliated agency that specifically addresses the rights of workers. The ILO is a tripartite organization that allocates membership to governments, labor and management; the latter two are ostensibly independent from government -though that is clearly not the case with China's totalitarian system. It is even more disgraceful that China holds one of the 10 government seats reserved on the ILO's executive council for "states of chief industrial importance."

In June 1998, the ILO adopted the Declaration of Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work, which obliged its members to observe four basic principles underlying a larger set of core labor standards. These principles were: freedom of association and the effective right to collective bargaining; the abolition of forced labor; the abolition of child labor; and the abolition of employment discrimination. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Unions Take on China
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.