Deck the Halls

By Weaver, Victoria | School Arts, December 1999 | Go to article overview

Deck the Halls


Weaver, Victoria, School Arts


This venue allows for additional praise for individuals and the school and removes the intimidation of sharing artwork with others.

Exhibiting student artwork is an essential component to any art program. Students, classroom teachers, administrators, parents, and volunteers can provide the inspiration as well as the muscle to make it successful. This approach to community involvement reinforces the proliferation of art in

schools by creating a positive atmosphere for all involved.

Schools benefit from the increased "interior decorations" and ongoing art lessons which accompany each display. In my school, we normally have five areas in which I present each grade's finished projects along with the objectives. Often our units of study incorporate classroom units which helps to reinforce and apply new materials. This venue allows for additional praise for individuals and the school and removes the intimidation of sharing artwork with others.

Preparing for Youth Art Month

My biggest challenge is the March Youth Art Month Schoolwide Art Show. Every student enters two of their best artworks. Fourth and fifth graders are allowed to choose their own from their portfolio. I act as coordinator of the lower grades by choosing successful class lessons to share. With over 500 students, it is quite a challenge to preserve the atmosphere of an orderly presentation.

I begin in October by having volunteers type up labels. Each student gets three labels. Two are used in the show and one is a back-up. (Many schools already have these in a database.)

Color Coordinating

In November, the volunteers cut floor-to-ceiling lengths of paper. The top ends are prepared for hanging by folding over and punching two holes where the paper clips will go. …

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