Wizards Enjoy Garden Party

By Mitchell, John N. | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 19, 1999 | Go to article overview

Wizards Enjoy Garden Party


Mitchell, John N., The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


NEW YORK - With a little less than a minute left in the Washington Wizards' game against the New York Knicks yesterday, 19,763 spectators at Madison Square Garden - perhaps coming to grips with the fact the Wizards were about to end the Knicks' five-game winning streak - began booing lustily at what they must have thought was a halfhearted effort by their team.

"It's good to hear that and know it's not directed at you," said Wizards forward Juwan Howard, often the target of vicious fans at MCI Center.

This time, though, the Wizards deserved nothing but applause for their 95-83 victory over the defending Eastern Conference champs. When coach Gar Heard needed them to hustle, they did. When they needed to dive for loose balls, they did. And what they did better than anything else was something they hadn't done well all season - and something they probably shouldn't have been able to do well against the Knicks: shoot effectively.

Just five teams in the NBA shoot the ball worse than the Wizards' 43.1 pace. No team has broken 50 percent against the Knicks (15-10), but the Wizards came close at 49 percent (33 of 67). Had they not missed some baskets in garbage time - which began when center Jahidi White hit two free throws that put the Wizards ahead 91-80 with 1:36 left - they would have done it. New York made just 38 percent (29 of 76) from the floor.

After the game, though, both Heard and his players raved about the Wizards' defense - an element that had been suspect at times this season.

"That was the best we've played defensively all year," Heard said of the 8-17 Wizards, who have beaten both NBA finalists in the same week. "Everybody was in to the game. We made shots when we had to. But when we needed to shut them down, we came up with big stops, big steals, we did. Overall, it was our best team effort."

There were fine efforts everywhere for the Wizards. Mitch Richmond led the scorers with 19 points while shooting an efficient 9-for-15. And White, making the second start of his two-year career, was impressive with 15 points and a game-high 10 rebounds.

And even though foul trouble limited what he could do for much of the game, Howard - who picked up his fourth personal foul with just under two minutes left - did an excellent defensive job on Latrell Sprewell, who finished with an innocuous six points.

Heard was particularly happy with the way White played, especially considering that he was matched against fellow Georgetown alumnus and future Hall of Famer Patrick Ewing, who finished with 18 points and eight rebounds. With White in the lineup instead of Ike Austin, who was benched before Thursday's win over New Jersey, the Wizards are 2-0.

"He's learning every game, and he's not backing down," Heard said of White. "He's taking the plays that are there, and I think that his teammates have a lot of confidence in him. When he's open, they'll throw him the ball. You have to give him credit."

White, who often works out with Ewing at Georgetown during the summer, didn't expect to be nervous against him on the Garden floor, but he was. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Wizards Enjoy Garden Party
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.