Embassy Row

By Morrison, James | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 5, 1998 | Go to article overview

Embassy Row


Morrison, James, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


50-50 FOREIGN POLICY

Along with some warnings to the West and veiled threats to neighbors, a former Russian ambassador to the United States explained his country's foreign policy goals for the future and reviewed accomplishments in 1997.

Vladimir Lukin, now chairman of the Foreign Affairs Committee of the Russian parliament, said Russia has national interests in the former Soviet republics in Asia and will assert its claim to Caspian Sea oil.

"The Caspian oil resources may soon become a field of either international cooperation or tough rivalry fraught with conflicts," he wrote in a paper distributed by the Russian Embassy.

"We are ready to negotiate a harmonic use of these riches with a view to satisfying the interests of all partners. But a discord may make all countries of the Caspian basin suffer."

He also warned the Baltics to expect Russia to use "economic leverage" to reverse what Moscow claims is discrimination against Russian speakers. Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia deny mistreating ethnic Russians.

"Russia's striving to improve relations with the Baltic states has brought little fruit," Mr. Lukin wrote. "[Their] tough policy toward Russian speakers in the region and their unwillingness to heed Russia's legitimate demands on the matter make Russia seek new methods of convincing them to comply.

"Thus, I believe, it is expedient to use the economic leverage in negotiating with Latvia."

Mr. Lukin said the new Russia-NATO council helped ease Moscow's concerns about the expansion of the Western alliance, but he warned that Russia must have a legitimate voice in NATO policy.

"If Russia's stance is heeded, the mechanism can well be seen as efficient," he wrote. "If it become an instrument of exclusively furthering decisions by [NATO], one has to admit that the standing Russia-NATO council is a gimmick intended to keep Russia happy."

He counted improved relations with China and Japan as among Russia's "largest achievements of 1997" and called the Russia-China border treaty a "breakthrough."

He said Russia's relations with Japan are "on the rise. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Embassy Row
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.