Cultural Cultivation of Tawdry Fame

By Roberts, Paul Craig | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 2, 1998 | Go to article overview

Cultural Cultivation of Tawdry Fame


Roberts, Paul Craig, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Monica Lewinsky's newly acquired sex star status is bringing her own boastful lovers out of the woodwork. The notoriety of sharing a woman with the president of the United States was too much for Andy Bleiler, a married high school drama teacher and theater technician, to pass up.

He has claimed an affair with Miss Lewinsky running from 1992, when she was a newly coined high school graduate, until the spring 1997. That overlaps him with Mr. Clinton as possessor of Miss Lewinsky's favors.

Mr. Bleiler apparently sees more gain to himself than harm from claiming the adulterous affair. Normally, the careers of educators aren't helped by affairs with young women, and wives usually feel humiliated by their husband's public boasting of unfaithfulness. On the other hand, maybe there are bragging rights, and even a book contract, in being the woman who shares the bed with the man who broke in the president's mistress.

It used to be that people confessed their transgressions. Now they boast of them. The TV talk shows and soaps have helped to turn sin into accomplishment. If Bill Clinton, Monica Lewinsky, and Andy Bleiler seem to confuse promiscuity with a merit badge, they are no more mixed up than the average schoolchild who has been through an aggressive sex-ed course.

The sexual revolution began with Alfred Kinsey's unorthodox and apparently unscientific, unethical, and illegal sexual experimentations. Kinsey's "findings" make heterosexual teen-age sex and adulterous affairs seem pretty tame and well within bounds. According to his critics, Kinsey favored unrestrained sexuality and concluded that no sexual act, not even with infants or animals, was truly deviant.

Margaret Mead, the feminist anthropologist, is reported to have said Kinsey's work "suggests no way of choosing between a woman and a sheep" or between a man and a dog.

Kinsey's work is not standing the test of time. The more that is learned about it, the more outraged people become. In Indiana, the House of Representatives has passed a concurrent resolution to cut off the Kinsey Institute of Indiana University from public funding. The resolution denounces "Kinsey's ideology that all sexual contacts are legitimate" and condemns "research employing criminal acts to obtain data in the name of science, especially sex crimes against children. …

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