Hopkins, Maryland Renew Bitter Rivalry

By Siegel, Jon | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 17, 1998 | Go to article overview

Hopkins, Maryland Renew Bitter Rivalry


Siegel, Jon, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Although the NCAA selection committee would never admit it, the members probably arranged the tournament pairings so Johns Hopkins and Maryland would meet this afternoon in College Park.

"It makes for a nice payoff for the NCAA," said Johns Hopkins coach Tony Seaman, whose team will meet the Terps in the NCAAs for the third time in four years. "This will probably be the biggest crowd in history for a quarterfinal game."

The attendance should shatter the quarterfinal record set in 1990 when 11,533 in Syracuse saw the Orangemen play Brown. Officials are expecting as many as 20,000, which would set a record for the largest non-Final Four game in NCAA lacrosse history.

UMBC's upset of Maryland, combined with Hopkins' loss to Loyola on the final day of the regular season, gave the committee all the justification it needed to set up the matchup at Byrd Stadium, a predetermined quarterfinal site.

Although Maryland (12-2) had been the country's top-ranked team for much of the season, and easily could have been given a top-four seed, the Terps were seeded fifth. Hopkins (10-3) was fourth, and Syracuse was awarded a No. 3 after tying for sixth in the polls.

This will be the 94th time Hopkins and Maryland have met since 1895. Naturally, classic games abound between schools that are separated by only 32 miles.

Maryland assistant coach Dave Slafkosky played for Hopkins when the Blue Jays lost to the Terps in double overtime in the 1973 championship game. He also was on the Hopkins team that beat Maryland in the 1974 title game.

Terps assistant coach Scott Marr went through a similar experience when the teams met in the 1995 NCAA quarterfinals. Marr played for Hopkins' championship team in 1987, when the Blue Jays eliminated the Terps in the semifinals. But in 1995, Marr, in his first year at Maryland, faced his brother, Dave, who played in the NCAA semifinal.

Terps goalkeeper Brian Dougherty became a hero that day when he shut down one of the greatest attacks of all time, and Maryland handed the Blue Jays their only loss of the season 16-8.

"Our whole lives we had talked about winning the national championship," said Scott Marr, whose brother got revenge when the Blue Jays eliminated the Terps in 1996. "To break his dream there in '95 was one of the toughest things I've done in my life. There are other strong rivalries, but I don't think they quite match this one. Every time we play, it seems like it's directly related to the national championship or a top ranking."

Maryland has reached the title game two of the past three seasons but is still in search of its first title since 1975. …

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