Brief Encounters

By Chaffee, Kevin | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 20, 1996 | Go to article overview

Brief Encounters


Chaffee, Kevin, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


CRACKS IN CAMELOT?:

Jacqueline Kennedy got back at her philandering husband by having an affair with actor William Holden, according to a new book that also says the White House couple were hooked on speed.

The tidbits are contained in "Jack and Jackie: Portrait of an American Marriage," by Christopher Andersen, published this week by William Morrow.

The book describes John F. Kennedy as having affairs with a string of beauties, including Marilyn Monroe, Audrey Hepburn, Sophia Loren, Angie Dickinson, Lee Remick and Gene Tierney and stripper Tempest Storm.

Mr. Andersen, biographer of Mick Jagger and Madonna, writes that in 1955, during the second year of the marriage, Mrs. Kennedy was contemplating divorce over Kennedy's womanizing. He cites author Gore Vidal, a family intimate, as reporting secondhand that one of Kennedy's conquests was Mrs. Kennedy's sister, Lee Radziwill.

"Jackie's response to JFK's philandering, said Mr. Vidal, was to embark on a brief affair with William Holden," the book says.

Several years later, Mrs. Kennedy had a romance with Roswell Gilpatric, Kennedy's deputy defense secretary, Mr. Andersen writes. He quotes Mr. Gilpatric as saying he and Mrs. Kennedy "loved each other" and became "romantically involved" during the White House years.

"She had certain needs, and I'm afraid Jack was capable of giving only so much," Mr. …

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