Embassy Row

By Morrison, James | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 28, 1996 | Go to article overview

Embassy Row


Morrison, James, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


FLYING DUTCHMAN

Dutch Foreign Minister Hans van Mierlo today begins two intensive days of talks in Washington on issues ranging from Asia to Yugoslavia.

In 13 hours of meetings today and tomorrow, this flying Dutchman will visit 12 top officials - and still find time to hold two press conferences.

This morning he begins a crowded schedule of meetings, starting with Cesar Gaviria, secretary-general of the Organization of American States.

He also plans to meet President Clinton's special Middle East envoy, Dennis Ross, and Assistant Secretaries of State Robert Gelbard of international narcotics and law enforcement, Anne Patterson of inter-American affairs, John Kornblum of European and Canadian affairs and Princeton Lyman of international organizations.

Tomorrow he will meet National Security Adviser Anthony Lake and have lunch with Secretary of State Warren Christopher. He also has meetings scheduled with Undersecretary of Defense Walter Slocombe and Winston Lord, assistant secretary of state for Asia.

He plans a short news conference before lunch with Mr. Christopher at the State Department and an hourlong news conference after lunch, beginning at 1:45 p.m. at the Capitol Hill Club.

He will end his Washington visit by calling on two Republican members of the House International Relations Committee, Reps. Cass Ballenger of North Carolina and Doug Bereuter of Nebraska.

FAHD SPECULATION

Officials at the Spanish Embassy in Saudi Arabia yesterday denied reports that King Fahd was planning to leave permanently for Spain.

A top embassy official told the Associated Press the Saudi government had inquired about the possibility of the monarch going to Spain for a rest. But he said the request was clearly for a limited stay.

Time magazine reported Sunday that King Fahd may soon leave for his summer vacation residence in Spain and never come back to Saudi Arabia, completing a gradual transition of authority to his half-brother, Crown Prince Abdullah.

The magazine said the king's entourage had been summoned to the airport three times in the past month for an international trip, only to be called back to the palace. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Embassy Row
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.