Inside the Beltway

By McCaslin, John | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 23, 1997 | Go to article overview

Inside the Beltway


McCaslin, John, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


VETERAN PLAYER

"Introducing Bill Cohen to the Armed Services Committee is a little like introducing Cal Ripken to the Baltimore Orioles."

- Sen. Olympia J. Snowe, Maine Republican and member of the Armed Services Committee, observing yesterday that former Maine Sen. William S. Cohen served on the committee, which is now considering his nomination to become secretary of defense, for the past 18 years.

NEWS TRAVELS SLOWLY

Actual letter sent to us by a lobbyist in Canada and received yesterday:

"I have been asked to track down the following two people to write speeches for my boss before the Canadian Government.

"They are:

"Peggy Noonan, past speechwriter for both presidents Reagan and Bush.

"Dick Morris.

"If you could help me with a name or address for one or the other or both, I would be in debt to you."

CHEW THE FAT

Tony Blankley, former spokesman to House Speaker Newt Gingrich, says he has just one problem with Herblock's editorial cartoon in The Washington Post yesterday that shows him, the speaker and Rep. Nancy L. Johnson, Connecticut Republican and chairman of the ethics panel - the latter dressed as a maid and holding a worn broom - beneath the caption: "Blankley, I think Nancy here has done a great job of tidying things up for us."

"My only regret is that he's drawn me in my pre-diet shape!" says Mr. Blankley, who pictures himself as being slimmer.

Mr. Blankley says he's still not ready to announce his future career path, but will shortly.

"I'm expect to be speaking publicly and writing publicly on politics" is all Mr. Blankley says for the record.

LIVING A LITTLE

Mikhail Baryshnikov can't be in training. The ballet legend favored Cuban-rolled Partagas cigars, apple brandy and chef Robert Weidmaier's specially prepared foie gras more than once recently while dining at Aquarelle in the Watergate Hotel.

AMENDMENT ANYONE?

Yesterday, this column critiqued a Washington Post op-ed essay by Diane MacEachran about how Bill Clinton would return as president in January 2009. We concluded that Miss MacEachran must not have read the Constitution.

The 22nd Amendment, after all, states: "No person shall be elected to the office of the President more than twice."

As for one suggested loophole - that Mr. Clinton could persuade Al Gore to pick him as vice president - we cited the 12th Amendment that "no person constitutionally ineligible to the office of president shall be eligible to that of Vice President of the United States."

Several readers rejoiced in our assurances. …

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