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Inside the Beltway

By McCaslin, John | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 19, 1999 | Go to article overview

Inside the Beltway


McCaslin, John, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


CRAMMING TO IMPEACH

Inside the Beltway has traced two "urgent" orders for Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist's "Grand Inquests: The Historic Impeachments of Justice Samuel Chase and President Andrew Johnson" to Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott of Mississippi and House Majority Whip Tom DeLay of Texas.

"They were panic-stricken about it," an employee of the acquisitions section of the Library of Congress said of the congressional requests for the 1992 volume.

The orders, a copy of which we obtained, were dated Dec. 29, one day after Senate Democrats gave up trying to stop the impeachment trial of President Clinton.

"There are urgent congressional request(s) for this title," it says on the purchase orders.

The Library of Congress, the orders show, turned to Global Booksearch of Menlo Park, Calif., to help acquire the volumes written by the chief justice, who is now presiding over Mr. Clinton's impeachment trial.

Furthermore, the billing codes on the forms show that taxpayers picked up the costs of both orders: $153 and $108.50.

The 303-page volume, published by Morrow Books, is a study of two dramatic impeachment trials in our nation's history.

UNCOMFORTABLE SEATS

The big question on everybody's mind, given the history of Senate decorum for the office of the presidency, is how Republicans, or even Democrats, will react to this evening's State of the Union address by President Clinton.

That said, GOPAC forwarded a note it received from one woman, who asked not to be identified, which reads:

"The sight of seeing senators applauding and giving standing ovations during the State of the Union address while they are also serving as jurors in his impeachment trial is especially repugnant. Maybe the senators should read the speech first and then take a vote to see if they want to hear it."

FITTING PRAYER

Ann Sheridan, president of the Georgetown Ignatian Society, has sent to every member of the Senate now sitting in judgment of President Clinton an abridged prayer composed by Bishop John Carroll in 1800 for the United States of America.

"Bishop Carroll was the founder of Georgetown University, President Clinton's alma mater," Mrs. Sheridan writes above the prayer. "One prays that members of the Senate - to whom it is being sent - will hold its words more closely than has our Chief Executive."

The bishop's prayer: "We pray Thee, O God of might, wisdom, and justice, through whom authority is rightly administered, laws are enacted, and judgment decreed, assist, with Thy Holy Spirit of counsel and fortitude, the President of these United States, that his administration may be conducted in righteousness, and be eminently useful to Thy people, over whom he presides, by encouraging due respect for virtue and religion; by a faithful execution of the laws in justice and mercy; and by restraining vice and immorality.

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