Inside Politics

By Pierce, Greg | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 9, 1999 | Go to article overview

Inside Politics


Pierce, Greg, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


ROPE-A-DOPE

Peggy Noonan, the author and former speechwriter for Presidents Reagan and Bush, was impressed by first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton's campaign debut Wednesday in upstate New York.

"Hand it to her. Hillary Clinton had a spectacular day," Mrs. Noonan said in an opinion piece in the Wall Street Journal.

Mrs. Noonan said Mrs. Clinton is doing two things right: nailing down her base on the left, and "absorbing attacks."

"For the next nine months or so she'll be playing rope-a-dope, exhausting her foes by taking every blow they can throw. She's doing this now because right now, it doesn't matter what is said of her.

"A year from now, when it matters, if New York's pundits - the Dunleavies and Dowds, the Brookhisers and Breslins - are still attacking her, they will look obsessed and winded.

"She will look long-suffering and glistening. The criticisms of '99 will be but a memory. Reporters will be reduced to covering her latest proposals. She knows this. Her people know this. It's why, right now, they don't mind attacks."

Mrs. Noonan added: "[Wednesday] was a very good day for Mrs. Clinton because it gave her wall-to-wall great coverage. But that may turn out to be good news for Republicans, in the same way that an alarm clock going off at the right time is good news. It rings, you hear it, you wake up and get dressed and stop dreaming and go to work."

GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY

A 19-hour blackout in one of New York's poorest neighborhoods gave Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani a golden opportunity to demonstrate his crisis-management skills as he heads toward an expected U.S. Senate race against first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, Reuters reports.

Political observers said yesterday that the blackout could not have happened on a better day for the Republican mayor because Mrs. Clinton, his likely Democratic opponent in the 2000 U.S. Senate race, was in New York for the start of a heavily publicized campaign-style tour.

"What better moment for a small, manageable catastrophe to strike New York City than the very day that Hillary Rodham Clinton went to an upstate farm on her gimmicky Listening Tour?" wrote New York Daily News columnist Jim Dwyer. "Rudy Giuliani, blackout boy, was back in Washington Heights on a Doing Tour."

Residents in the densely populated Washington Heights area in upper Manhattan were without electricity in sweltering heat from 10 p.m. Tuesday to 5 p.m. Wednesday.

Mr. Giuliani, known as a 24-hour-a-day mayor who visits the site of almost every large or small city catastrophe, sent extra police and city workers to provide safety, assistance and shelter.

He also vowed to sue Consolidated Edison Inc., which provides electricity to millions, after accusing the company of failing to have a solid backup plan in times of increased demand.

"People are going to be talking about this for a long time," said columnist Jimmy Breslin.

CLOSE TO HOME

Shots were fired last night near the hotel in Utica, N.Y., that was serving as a base for Hillary Rodham Clinton's Senate campaign.

No injuries were reported and the first lady was not in danger.

A man opened fire about 9 p.m. in a parking lot across the street from the rear of the Radisson Hotel, said restaurant manager Deni Frederick.

"The police responded and are dealing with it as a bar brawl," she said.

Campaign staffers and reporters from around the world are booked at the hotel. Most of them were out during the incident. Aides said Mrs. Clinton spent the night at a private residence.

BUSH CHANGES MIND

A day after aides said there was no time in his schedule, Republican presidential front-runner George W. Bush decided yesterday to make an impromptu appearance at a conference of minority journalists.

About 6,000 journalists from around the country were attending the Unity '99 conference in Seattle. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Inside Politics
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.