Workshop Outlines Local Approaches to `Undoing Racism'

By Liedtke, Cyndy | Nation's Cities Weekly, December 20, 1999 | Go to article overview

Workshop Outlines Local Approaches to `Undoing Racism'


Liedtke, Cyndy, Nation's Cities Weekly


In the spirit of NLC President Bob Knight's Futures Project to tackle racism, a workshop at Congress of Cities in Los Angeles focused on four projects that combat racism at the local level.

"Undoing Racism: Programs that Work and Why" gave participants a look at the efforts of a national media project, a fire department, a police department and a city government to reduce tensions and get the community talking about the issue.

Television Race Initiative in San Francisco works with public television stations, national nonprofits, local and national media, community groups, interfaith networks and educational institutions to create community dialogues around the issue of race relations.

The six public television stations participating in the project pair diverse programming with community outreach and meetings. The stations involved with the initiative are also working to diversify their staffs, according to Yvette Martinez, project manager of Television Race Initiative.

"As media gets blamed for being part of the problem on race relations we are attempting to be a part of the solution and find ways in which diverse programs on PBS can be catalysts for conversation, for dialogue, for community efforts and for different ways in engaging community and the station," she said.

Topics addressed in these programs include the history of slavery, affirmative action, Japanese American internment camps and interracial families. Next year digital divide, Vietnam war widows and controversy surrounding Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn.

The stations are attempting to build trust with the community, according to Martinez. The stations bring citizens in before, during and after the airing of programs to get community reaction.

Martinez offered the example of the public television station in Norfolk, Va., which hosted a community meeting on hate crimes. Over 300 came to this meeting, which happened to be held the day after the hate crime shooting at a Jewish community center in Los Angeles. Local police have partnered with the station and are using PBS programming in diversity training.

"We really feel these programs can break the ice with the community," and encourage discussion on race relations, Martinez said.

In Los Angeles, the fire department has been working to diversify internally while providing a venue to discuss issues within the community.

A 1994 probe found the department had a poor record in its treatment of minority employees, according to fire chief William Bamattre. Programs were put in place to reassess the department's treatment on minorities within the department and with the community to improve service.

"The tack that we took was to address these internal issues, to kind of clean up our own house first before we went out into the community and become more responsive to the people we serve," he said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Workshop Outlines Local Approaches to `Undoing Racism'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.