Gays Advance in California

By Elias, Thomas D. | Insight on the News, January 24, 2000 | Go to article overview

Gays Advance in California


Elias, Thomas D., Insight on the News


The governor of the Golden State is signing bills and executive orders intended to promote the homosexual agenda, including a redefinition of family and alleged gay-harassment laws.

California has become the friendliest place in America for homosexuals. So friendly, in fact, that most homosexual activists say that won't change even if the March ballot proposition known as the "Defense of Marriage Act" passes, as several polls indicate it may.

Gov. Gray Davis, a Democrat, wants "to build a new California based on hope instead of fear, tolerance instead of ignorance," and he has signed a package of new laws designed to make homosexual life in California easier. He also has signed executive orders reversing pro-family-rights policies mandated by his two Republican predecessors, George Deukmejian and Pete Wilson.

Davis' recent and most contentious order, signed in October, mandates social-service workers to consider homosexual couples -- and any other unmarried couples -- when making recommendations on the adoption of children. Both Wilson and Deukmejian had issued blanket orders to the state Department of Social Services to recommend rejection of adoption by any unmarried couple. Homosexuals had regarded that order as aimed at them.

"The previous administration took a position on who is fit and not fit to be a parent," says Davis. "This administration has decided to leave that decision to the professionals to decide who is fit to be a loving, nurturing parent."

Even before he issued his order, Davis had signed into law three measures that homosexual activists consider the most significant advances for the homosexual agenda in California in more than 20 years. The signings took place in a ceremony before a fund-raising dinner for a Southern California homosexual-rights group that also featured a speech by President Clinton.

One of those laws, effective Jan. 1, sets up a domestic partners' registration system, giving unmarried couples hospital-visitation rights. It also provides unmarried state-government workers in stable, recorded relationships with many of the same healthcare and pension benefits long enjoyed by married couples. Another law bans housing and job discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. A third outlaws harassment of homosexual students and teachers in public schools and colleges.

The bill prohibiting harassment of homosexuals in schools drew the most attention in California, however. Davis calls it "an attempt to beat back the forces of hatred," adding that "I refuse to allow hatred and ignorance to taint our schools, our classrooms and our children. …

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