Readers, Letters


To the Editors:

I just received my first issue of Russian Life. I read with great interest the comments by Alex Gordeuk [Letters, Oct/Nov 1999], and I could not disagree more.

Your articles are not too long. They are as long as is needed to tell the reader what needs being said. I, too, used to subscribe to Soviet Life and disagree that it was a more informative and entertaining magazine. For example, I would compare what was being said about Soviet agriculture with my personal experiences at various Sovkhoz's and Kolkhoz's as part of an agricultural delegation, and would observe substantial cognitive dissonance between what Soviet Life said and what I observed. Enough said. SL was better than nothing, but it falls far short of RL.

Your article on Lermontov is a good example. There is no way that you can shorten such an important subject into McDonald's-type predigested tidbits. Every word was important. The same goes for the hard-hitting article on the present state of Russian prison life.

You are not going to become a USA Today type of magazine, I hope.

You are to be congratulated on an outstanding magazine. I must admit that your editorial candor is most refreshing.

Sincerely,

Frederick A. Stresen-Reuter II

Lake Geneva, WI

To the Editors:

Just want to commend you on your wonderful magazine. I didn't know it existed until it appeared amongst our library's collection of periodicals. Anyway, I read the August/September edition cover-to-cover and then sent in for a subscription.

FYI, the impressario in the political cartoon feature would have been (Sol) Hurok, not Yurok. Hurok made his name bringing premiere European talent to Broadway (for example, he introduced this country to the then recent Oxford grads Peter Cooke, Dudley Moore, Jonathan Miller and Alan Bennett in "Beyond the Fringe").

In the feature on the convent at Borodino, the correct expression for a woman joining a religious order would be "taking the veil" (as opposed to "the cloth"). Priests, ministers, pastors, etc. of all denominations would be referred to as "men of the cloth."

Best regards,

Sarah Gallagher

To the Editors:

Thank you for your magazine. My wife and I returned home from Russia in January with our baby boy. I have been looking for a magazine about Russian life ever since. We want to learn about Russia so we can pass it on to Jordan. He was 5 1/2 months old when we came home and has been growing like a weed ever since. He is now 13 months old and starting to walk.

Thanks again,

Jack, Jane & Jordan Copeland

To the Editors:

Thank you for your very interesting and informative magazine, Russian Life.

However, in your Vol. 42, No. 5 issue, in the article "A Widow's Legacy," there is an error. …

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