Timeline


00 November 1900

Eugene Debs runs for President, polls 95,000

1900

Scott Joplin's 1899 "Maple Leaf Rag" breakout hit

1900

Freud's Interpretation of Dreams

01 January 22, 1901

Queen Victoria dies

February 1901

US Steel founded by J.P. Morgan

July 29, 1901

Socialist Party founded

October 16, 1901

Teddy Roosevelt lunches with Booker T. Washington

02 May 1902

UMW anthracite coal strike

1902

Teddy Bear introduced

03 July 1903

Mother Jones leads child workers in demanding 55-hour week

October 13, 1903

Boston Americans win first World Series

December 17, 1903

Wright brothers' first airplane flight

1903

Human rights campaign against 20-year Belgian genocide in Congo rises

04 May 5, 1904

Cy Young pitches first perfect game

November 9, 1904

TR elected President

05 April 17, 1905

Supreme Court rules NY's law setting 60-hour week unconstitutional

1905

Einstein's Theory of Relativity

06 April 18, 1906

San Francisco quakes

June 30, 1906

Pure Food and Drug Act, Meat Inspection Act passed

07 March 21, 1907

Marines land in Honduras

1907

Picasso's Les Demoiselles d'Avignon, precursor of Cubism

1907

William James's Pragmatism

08 November 3, 1908

Taft elected President

December 26, 1908

Jack Johnson KOs "great white hope" 09 September 1909

Freud lectures at Clark University

November 22, 1909

Female shirtwaist makers strike

1909

Frank Lloyd Wright's Robie House in Chicago

1909

97 Negroes lynched in US 1909

Socialist-feminist Charlotte Perkins Gilman founds Forerunner

10 January 13, 1910

Metropolitan Opera broadcast on wireless

July 4, 1910

Jack Johnson KOs "great white hope," touching off race riots

November 8, 1910

Victor Berger, first Socialist elected to Congress

1910

Publication of The Fundamentals, tenets of Fundamentalism

1910

9 million women wage earners; three-fourths earn less than $8 per week

11 February 1911

The Masses founded

March 25, 1911

Triangle Shirtwaist fire kills 146; exit doors locked

April 11, 1911

Triangle owners indicted for manslaughter

May 15, 1911

Supreme Court "breaks up" Standard Oil Trust into latter-day Exxon, SoCal, Mobil, Sohio and Standard Oil of Indiana

1911

Twelve states pass workmen's compensation laws

1911

"Everybody's Doing It" (the Turkey Trot)

1911

Irving Berlin's "Alexander's Ragtime Band" gives ragtime "white sound"

12 February 1912

US Marines land in Honduras

June 1912

US Marines land in Cuba

Summer 1912

Indian Jim Thorpe wins pentathlon and decathlon in Olympics

August 1912

US Marines land in Nicaragua

September 27, 1912

W.C. Handy's "The Memphis Blues"-first published blues hit

November 5, 1912

Wilson elected President

13 March 3, 1913

Suffragists march on Washington

May 29, 1913

Stravinsky's Rite of Spring hooted in Paris

July 1913

IWW-led Paterson silk strikers starved to defeat

Summer 1913

Assembly line introduced by Ford

November 1913

Marcel Proust's Swann's Way

December 23, 1913

Federal Reserve Board created

1913

Socialist paper Appeal to Reason reaches 1 million readers

1913

Charles Beard's An Economic Interpretation of the Constitution

14 January 5, 1914

Ford pays $5 a day

April 20, 1914

Ludlow massacre of striking coal miners, wives, children in Colorado

July 15, 1914

Woodrow Wilson intervenes in Mexican Revolution

July 28, 1914

World War I begins

September 26, 1914

Federal Trade Commission created

October 15, 1914

Clayton Antitrust Act recognizes rights of labor

November 13, 1914

Western Federation of Miners strikers crushed by militia in Butte

November 1914

Brassiere patented; will replace corset

1914

Woodrow Wilson orders segregation of federal workplace

15 January 25, 1915

Supreme Court upholds "yellow dog" contracts, which forbid membership in labor unions

April 5, 1915

White Hope KOs Jack Johnson

April 1915

Turkish genocide of Armenians begins

June 9, 1915

Secretary of State Bryan resigns, protesting Wilson's prowar drift

November 19, 1915

Copper bosses execute Joe Hill

November 1915

Ku Klux Klan revived in Georgia

1915

Provincetown Playhouse opens

1915

Scott Joplin's opera Treemonisha has one performance

16 September 3, 1916

Railroad workers win 8-hour day

September 7, 1916

Federal employees win Workmen's Compensation Act

July-November 1916

Somme offensive-Allies lose 794,000 men, gain 7 miles

November 5, 1916

Everett, Washington, massacre of Wobbly strikers

November 7, 1916

Wilson re-elected December 21, 1916

Secretary of State says war likely; stock market soars

17 January 26, 1917

Original Dixieland Jass [sic] band brings white jazz to NYC

March 1917

Russian troops mutiny on Eastern Front

April 6, 1917

Congress declares war

April 6, 1917

George M. …

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