Cohabitation Isn't Nirvana on Earth, 2 Sociologists Say

By Wetzstein, Cheryl | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 3, 1999 | Go to article overview

Cohabitation Isn't Nirvana on Earth, 2 Sociologists Say


Wetzstein, Cheryl, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


America's 4 million cohabiting couples live together to save money, test-run a marriage, have a ready sexual partner and stave off loneliness, says a report on cohabitation.

However, research indicates that living together often leads to broken romances and child abuse - not happiness, sociologists David Popenoe and Barbara Dafoe Whitehead say in a study released today.

In fact, cohabiting appears to be so counterproductive to long-lasting marriage that unmarried couples should avoid living together - especially if it involves children, wrote the sociologists, who are directors of the National Marriage Project at Rutgers University.

Living together is "a fragile family form that poses increased risk to women and children," said Mrs. Whitehead, who captured national attention with her 1993 Atlantic Monthly article, "Dan Quayle Was Right."

"Women tend to see [living together] as a step toward eventual marriage, while men regard it more as a sexual opportunity without the ties of long-term commitment," she wrote with Mr. Popenoe in their report, "Should We Live Together? What Young Adults Need to Know About Cohabitation Before Marriage."

But people who live in uncommitted relationships may be unwilling to work out problems, and instead, will start searching for less fractious relationships with a new partner.

Women should know that "if you think that this is a way to get him to commit, you're likely to be disappointed," said Mrs. Whitehead.

The report comes amid unprecedented growth in the number of cohabiting couples in America. In 1997, the total number of unmarried couples living together in America was 4. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cohabitation Isn't Nirvana on Earth, 2 Sociologists Say
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.